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RideT61

Alpine pack features

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I'm making an alpine pack (something like the Andinista only a bit smaller)using a simple harness and hipbelt from a lightweight pack and some ripstop dyneema fabric (by far lightest and most durable for the price smile.gif). I have a pretty good idea of what I want but thought it might be interesting to see what ideas I could get out of this place.

The pack will have:

A removable pad, utilize 3/4" webbing (instead of 1" to save weight) an extention collar and removable floating lid, 3 point haul pounts... what else should I consider? wave.gif

Edited by RideT61

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incorporate a load-bearing climbing harness as the waist strap for the pack, or at least some kind of weight/mess saving 'clip-on' option to elimintate two waist belts.

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Thoughts: an alpine pack should be simple and streamlined, and of course have attachments for your tools of choice. Outside of that, I think the most important part is the fitting. I have had a pack made for me by Dan McHale, and he fit it based on a few measurements, including how long my back is, etc. Also the harness and straps should be designed to carry the load most efficiently and comfortably.

 

It sounds to me like you're not asking fit questions, and that just leaves the "what attachments do you want?" questions. The reason you're not getting any answers is probably because the answer is "as few as possible".

 

I guess one design point is to make sure you put on a nice sturdy haul strap that you can clip your pack into and yard it with that won't break when the pack is full.

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I guess one design point is to make sure you put on a nice sturdy haul strap that you can clip your pack into and yard it with that won't break when the pack is full.

 

girth hitch the shoulder straps with a sling for hauling. Shoulder straps should be the strongest attachment point.

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I sewed was was the Greatest Pack Ever Built, but it died after two years of abuse. cry.gif

 

But it ruled:

-no frame

-removable foam pad

-huge lid for carrying crap; for climbing take the lid off and stick it inside, vertically adjustable, etc

-narrow hipbelt, light and good for climbing

-six long compression straps, worth the weight for sure

-standard tool loops, work better than tool tubes IMHO

-2500 or so cubic inches, perfect for winter overnight ski trips, day trips, etc, etc.

-simple and weighed about 1.5 lbs. thumbs_up.gif

 

And the best part was that it was ORANGE. laugh.gif

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RideT61, i can appreciate this undertaking of yours & your choice of fabric. i've held off for a long time on making my own pack. but with respect to fabric, i can share with you what i detest most about my Kelty Flight, which i've almost abandoned. the section that rests on your back is made of ripstop & it slides around like a bugger - especially if worn over a nylon windshirt or even gortex. for non-tech overnight it's *tolerable*, but after adding hardware & rope it can become a bit of a nuisance, for example: the pack slips around as i'm walking down wet or icy talus, or climbing/crawling over big windfall. so you better have a super snug fitting hipbelt & sternum strap to go with. for this reason alone, i returned to the Khamsin. good luck!

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A few intesting thoughts so far. I agree, simple is good. The pack will be sleek and light without a frame (just a removable bivy pad)and about 2800 cubic inches.

As for Dru's idea. Maybe with enough helium in my pack I could solo 5.14!

The idea of incorporating a harness into the system is interesting. It would be nice on the climb but I think it might be a bit uncomfortable on the approach. It would save some weight though. My hipbelt will be removable.

As for the fabric choice, I'm not using 100% spectra fabric, I'm using 140 d ripsop (only the ripstop gris is spectra). 100% spectra is MUCH more expensive and not THAT much more durable.

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One problem I have had with a pack that had 3/4 inch webbing instead of 1 inch is that the 3/4 inch plastic buckles are too weak; when I yard on the compression straps the buckles break. AArrg. 3/4 inch webbing would be fine with a different buckle. Why not use two small stainless rings instead of a buckle (you know, like on Charlet Moser crampon straps). I have made these two-ring buckles on home made sailing harnesses and they work great. Make those compression straps really long so you can strap a tent or a full size sleeping pad on the sides of your pack for approaches.

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one problem with rings is the cursing it causes when your trying to rig them with be-gloved frozen fingers.

I would consider putting some reinforced hapalon strips, or some such other on the bottom and up into the lower lumbar, it will extend the life of the bottom and keep it from creeping down your back as fast. Two long comp straps on the back aligned on the thirds lines are really handy for attaching different tools and for compressing the pack when it is underloaded.

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Tuna dude, if the straps are plenty long you will not often need to thread them through the rings. What is a "long comp strap"? I am also having a hard time with the image of your bottom creeping down your back.

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i just got one of those grivel alpine packs, and the inside is a crisp yellow, which helps to reflect light around when you're diggin' through your shit thumbs_up.gif

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Stretchy side pockets(big enough to hold a nalgene but tight against the pack when not used) and compression straps. Schoeller works good for these.

These pockets are good for securing pickets and waterbottles. If you pack your sleeping bag tight enough, the bottles don't stick out much and more weight is closer to your hips.

Make it large enough to put a 1/2 -3/4 length pad around the inside, which will stablize the frameless pack and keep the pad on the inside.

I like the axe loops too. Tubes are too heavy and don't work with leashless. A sturdy piece of something on the back and small tie points for crampons.

Basically, like the granite Gear Alpine light pack, but without the tool tubes and with Schoeller side pockets.

That pack weighs about 3 pounds. If you use your Dyneema, it should be a lot lighter.

A gear loop on each side is nice too.

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