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Clivus

Giro ski helmet as climbing helmet?

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My new Giro Fuse ski helmet weighs in at 14oz. Anyone know of a disadvantage to using this as a climbing helmet in cooler conditions? What are the differences in the standards that this helemet meets vs. my old Petzl Ecrin?

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I think that ski helmets are designed for low force impacts (ie- whacking the back of your head on an icey slope repeatedly). I don't think ski helmets such as the Fuse or any styrofoam based ski helmet is designed to absorb a big hit such as rockfall.

Most climbing helmets are designed as hard hats for the most part and with the plastic shell and internal webbing system can absorb a much higher impact and remain intact to protect you from another hit.

just my opinion...i wouldn't trust using a ski helmet if in a situation where rockfall or icefall exposure is possible.

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I'd be very suprised if Giro ski helmets are rated to the same standards that any climbing helmets are.

Anyways...I'm just going off the information that I remember reading in Twight's book...in case you don't have it, Mr.Twights opinion on lightweight styrofoam climbing helmets is as follows...and I imagine it could also be applied to ski helmets as well.

as I said, its just my two cents...I ain't no expert.

 

From Extreme Alpinism-

'several companies offer brain buckets based on bike helmet designs, These are lined with foam that deforms upon impact to absorb shock. Unfortunately, the helmet is useless once it has sustained an impact great enough to deform it. You simply toss it away and buy a new one. That won't be possible in the mountains and where one rock falls, many usually follow."

"They belong on roadside day routes. They have no place in the mountains where only the real thing will do"

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I think that ski helmets are designed for low force impacts (ie- whacking the back of your head on an icey slope repeatedly). I don't think ski helmets such as the Fuse or any styrofoam based ski helmet is designed to absorb a big hit such as rockfall.

Most climbing helmets are designed as hard hats for the most part and with the plastic shell and internal webbing system can absorb a much higher impact and remain intact to protect you from another hit.

just my opinion...i wouldn't trust using a ski helmet if in a situation where rockfall or icefall exposure is possible.

 

Actually - the "safest" helmet on he market today climbing wise is the Petzl Meteor ie the "bike helmet". This is based on the energy absorption on the helmets on the market. The Petzl rep said the foam does the best job but that most people avoid it because it looks like a bike helmet. The "deformation" is what takes the hit. The difference between a ski helmet and climbing helmet is probably the fact that RATED climbing helmets have to survive a puncture test as well... Not sure if the ski helmet would do that. I can could go on and on...

 

Anyway - it would probably be ok (better than nothing at all) but for another $50 or so you could have a sport specific helmet.

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I am pretty sure that the Giro Nine.9 and one of the Giro bike helmets are from the exact same mold...

 

I don't think I would be comfortable w/ any of the foam helmets for climbing, since I would worry about the problem of a large pointy rock going right through the foam.

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My new Giro Fuse ski helmet weighs in at 14oz. Anyone know of a disadvantage to using this as a climbing helmet in cooler conditions?

Aside from the concerns mentioned above, I think it would be too hot for climbing in. I ski in a Giro Nine.9 and it's the warmest thing I've ever put on my head, and that's when going downhill with the wind in my face.

 

Unless it was really, really cold, I think you'd rapidly overheat while climbing with that type of helmet on.

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the fuse has vents to regulate temps and is extremely comfortable ... but i would not use it for ice or rock climbing beyond any scrambling or short "non-technical" stuff i might need to overcome to continue my ski ascent/descent. i do hope, though, that my fuse would offer me some protection were i to take a big header into a tree!

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This is based on the energy absorption on the helmets on the market. The Petzl rep said the foam does the best job but that most people avoid it because it looks like a bike helmet. The "deformation" is what takes the hit. The difference between a ski helmet and climbing helmet is probably the fact that RATED climbing helmets have to survive a puncture test as well... Not sure if the ski helmet would do that. I can could go on and on...

Are you missing the point? Foam helmets absorb impact by permanent deformation, which makes them single hit helmets. If you mean safest by absorbing the greatest single impact this may be true. The advantage of the hardhat style helmets is they absorb impact by distributing it over a larger area, allowing multiple impacts.

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