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PaulB

Matching Half Ropes?

Would you?  

105 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you?

    • 1360
    • 1360


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You want to start using half ropes. You already own a 8.5mm x 60m Mammut Genesis rope that is 4 years old. It has only been used for glacier travel and a few 4th class alpine climbs, and has never caught a fall.

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Part of the reason to suggest buying two new half ropes is that the reason you always match rope brands and models. You want to keep the characteristics of the ropes as identical as possible. With a four year old rope, even if it never caught any falls, the rope has aged, and even without any use, a rope only basically has ten years before it loses too much elasticity just from the nylon losing plasticity.

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most rope companys and testers give a five year suggestion to retire your ropes. thats why they all have the made date on them.

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if the same logic was applied to other equipment my 1990 Subaru would be rusting needlessly in the junkyard.

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I think it is important to match twin ropes exactly, but less important to match half ropes. The twins get clipped together and are meant to stretch the same amount so both ropes catch you at once if you fall. Half ropes are clipped independently and are likely to be varying in length and friction when they catch a fall anyway; this is why half ropes each have to be able to hold a fall by themselves. It seems to me that it would be less important for half ropes to have precisely matched characteristics, though it may be best.

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Lets say you had two twin ropes or half ropes and you got a core shot in one of them from a nasty sharp rock falling on it, would you throw away both of them and buy two new ones just to have a matched pair yellaf.gif

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whynt you just spoil your miserable ass and buy two new ropes. aint nobody else givig a fuk wether you live or die so you might as well look after yourself. know what i mean?

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whynt you just spoil your miserable ass and buy two new ropes.

I think I'll do just that, especially since I got my MEC share redemption cheque in the mail yesterday. thumbs_up.gif

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Can I have your old one? Seriously, I'd give you a few bucks for it...

Edited by Bogen

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Can I have your old one?

Ummm... no. Despite the fact that it is only 6 months shy of being 5 years old, I'll likely continue to use it for a couple more years of 4th classing and glacier travel.

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Oh well. I'm in the same boat, but would rather buy a used 8.5 to go with the one I have.

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