Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
selkirk

Leader Falls on a Rope...

Recommended Posts

 

ahh dude...I get my ass waxed monthly by a cute Puerto Rican guy named Pepe. Wearing a thong is so liberating! fruit.giffruit.gif

 

Could we stay on topic here? Dude is asking about ropes and you're getting into all kinds of weird shit. shocked.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all, congratulations on your first leader fall! The more you fall, the more you will improve. Trust me, I've logged a LOT of flight time. Usually the first fall or two of a season would be enough to get the fear cobwebs out of the head so I could be more serious in my efforts.

 

Regarding your question of when to retire a rope, I think a number of people have already responded with the correct observation that your fall was about a 0.33 factor and probably less if you take into account that your fall probably had a dynamic belay and friction from your body on less than vertical rock, etc. etc.

 

Personally, I fell on a given rope dozens if not hundreds of times. Most of the falls had less than 0.2 factor, since they were often higher up a climb with more rope to hold the fall. The most important reasons I would retire a rope would be if it had core showing through the mantle from an abrasion or cut, if sand had worked its way into the rope too much, or it just got plain old cruncy sounding from becoming brittle from UV exposure.

 

Nothing like the soft pliable feel of a new rope...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×