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Cycling vs Running

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btw: runners knee is from running uphill.

Runner's knee is pain and inflammation in the cartiledge under the kneecap. Usually this results from a muscle imbalance around the kneecap, weak quads or overpronation. Running on sidehills or downhills will irritate this condition, moreso than uphills.

 

http://www.runningonline.com/zine/Injuries/91.sht

"Prevention: Avoid Downhills"

 

http://www.medinfosource.com/expert/exp3031201a.html

"Chondromalacia patella can oftentimes be treated by decreasing or eliminating the exercise that is causing the problem (such as running down hills)"

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What about an old one-speed piece-of-shit bike for workouts? Or a track bike? Wouldn't this give a better workout than a traditional Mtn/road bike?

 

I wouldn't think so; having the right gear means being able to have the right cadence, which means you can get a more consistant cardio workout. That said, it doesn't allow you to puss out and ride a smaller gear up the hills, but if you do that you suck anyways. shocked.gifhahaha.gifhellno3d.gif

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Are any of the cyclists here concerned about being squashed by cars?

 

Unlike rolling around in a 3 ton SUV, cyclists need to pay attention to their 'driving', being acutely aware of the road and traffic around them. Surprising to most cyclists, it also helps to follow the rules of the road and act like another car, not like a self-involved moron.

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Are any of the cyclists here concerned about being squashed by cars?

 

Unlike rolling around in a 3 ton SUV, cyclists need to pay attention to their 'driving', being acutely aware of the road and traffic around them. Surprising to most cyclists, it also helps to follow the rules of the road and act like another car, not like a self-involved moron.

 

Heheh, no! Cars are the enemy!! evils3d.gifhahaha.gif

 

I find it's usually good to act like the 160 lb. watermellon that I effectively am to cars. Usually this means I slink along as far away from the cars as I can. But if it means I have to commit the occasional infraction to protect myself from becoming a red stain on the road, then so be it...

 

Also, bikes don't come with horns. Which is okay, because you have so many more options when it comes to yelling down the many oblivious drivers that you encounter. boxing_smiley.gif

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i am more concerned crashing on my own due to wet/oily pavement or gravel than because of cars (i avoid busy street/roads). since we typically have a fair amount of wet weather outside summer, i tend to think that running is safer despite greater opportunities for joint problems. one major wipe out on a bike has greater chance of cramping your style for a long time than injuring a joint while running would (especially if you run conservatively, i.e. no pavement, stretching, etc ...). however as has been said a combination of both seems to be best.

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Cycling is what I choose for my aerobic workouts. I work out aerobicly so that approaches are easier for me. I feel that running works my leg muscles the same way they are worked when I hiking to the base of the crag or mountain. The reason why I like cycling is cause I feel like I can hammer one day and then go out climbing the next without being tired. I also like all the ground that I can cover on my bike, it opens up a lot more terrain from my doorstep, compared to running. The one thing that I don't like about cycling is the time commitment, definitely takes longer to get a good aerobic work out in. As for getting hit, I don't worry about it, in the city I move just about as fast as traffic on average, the PNW seems to be quite curtious to cyclist, and there are bike lanes and trail if you don't feel comfortable on the road. Riding on the open streets you just have to ride agressively, which is fun. If you are interested in staying injury free I would reccomend road riding over mountain biking, I have hurt myself more time riding my mountain bike than I have in any other sport, though I still love mountain biking.

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I just made the switch from running to cycling due to an ankle that won't run much anymore after a climbing fall. The jury's still out: road biking is more fun than I thought it would be, but you do need to ride longer to get an equivalent workout to running. Cardio and overall fitness is improving fairly quickly, tho.

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Try mountain biking, long dirt road climbs will get you breathing HARD. There are some loops off of SR 410 that will make you real strong. I suggest the Palisades loop, 20 miles with a 2,700' road climb plus more climbing on the way down. Some hike a bike but no steep downhill. In 2 or 3 hours you can get a fun workout on lowland trails when the wether is shitty in the winter. You are working so hard you don't get cold. It's not bad riding in the rain 'cause your in the trees.

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I too am thinking of switching to road biking. Any good reccomendations for a good road bike (my budget is ~ $800).

 

Sorry for diverting this thread...

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I just bought one. Not many deals out there, but this is the right time of year to look. The manufacteres under produced again so not very many 04s laying around.

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Running- Running how? where?

 

On a flat trail, up a hill on a road?

 

Running on a flat road I don’t think relates as much help muscle wise for alpine climbing as cycling up hills but aerobically; yes it does help.

 

I think running on a trail is good. But usually it doesn’t do much to exercise some muscles like the back and shoulders where you would get use carrying a heavy pack. Here you gain the agility often encountered and usable on talus and scree somewhat… However ankles get twisted, nasty spills can happen, and you get the idea.

 

On the other hand I prefer to ride a bicycle on the road or dirt trail with uphills thrown in for good measure. If it’s not that long of a hill you can always time yourself and strive to make the trips faster than the last one. Or you can do it more than once – whatever… Cycling is easier on my knees and really targets some of the same muscles it seems as hiking. One could avoid the “dangers of cycling” by going on maintained paths if they are available. That’s another subject altogether if you ask me..

 

In a nutshell I think one could replace running with cycling and still maintain great fitness for alpine climbing. I quit running 3 years ago and cycle currently 3-6 times a week for 1 -3 hours each session. I feel fine doing similar activities or maybe slightly better in some ways. I have lost some agility on the rock talus but I can live with that.

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Anybody have an opinion on rollerblading? I started blading to the bus a couple of weeks ago, have no idea if it will keep me fit. Am fairly certain it will keep me covered in scabs though grin.gif

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Cycling all the way! i hate running, cycling is fun and a great work out.

 

So far this summer...here is mt breakdown of outdoor activity-

85% - Cycling (mtb and road)

10% - Sailing ...a good rest day

5% - climbing

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Cycling...fun and a great workout...yes

Running...depends on what you're you running from?

 

One aspect of alpine climbing that needs to factored into the fitness training equation is the monotony of long approaches and the BOREDOM that typically accompanies them.

(i'm not refering to the exciting devils club thrash approach in the cascades, i'm talkin more along the lines of Coastal Range, Alaska, peruvian/bolivian andes, baffin & greenland, and other greater ranges)

 

This is where cycling fails for me. yeah my cardio and leg muscles benefit greatly, but the "fun-ness" of it all does not mentally prepare me to combat boredom. even when climbing long hills, just the very thought of descending the backside at light speed keeps the "psych-ness" up and the ride remains fun.

 

on the other hand, as much as i loathe running, it does serve a purpose, other than seeking immediate safety. I use it to enhance my tolerance for boredom.

Therefore, I typically show up at the gym at 5am (weekdays) with a camelbak, work the treadmill up to about 9-10% grade and run at 6-7 mm for 35-45 minutes (listening to headphones is aid). so, as I am working on my tolerance for boredom, my legs, abs, back, cardio are all getting the proper hill climbing treatment.

 

Do Not underestimate the power of ski touring (the ultimate conditioner). ski tour your ass off all winter/spring and watch yourself fire any peak with ease, then stand atop the summit and shout (quoting alex huber at his latok slideshow) "I have power to waste."

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Cycling is far superior to running. Your joints have a finite life span. Know many runners in their 50's? If you do ask them when they started - most will have started later in life. Cycling allows you to train for 4 hours - try that running.

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Cycling is far superior to running.

 

Perhaps for saving your knees yes but not as a blanket statement. Bottom line: do both and vary month to month so your body doesn't become acclimated.

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Cycling is far superior to running. Your joints have a finite life span. Know many runners in their 50's? If you do ask them when they started - most will have started later in life. Cycling allows you to train for 4 hours - try that running.

 

Have to agree with the distance running and age thing. Been running for 32 years and some hip things are cropping up. That said, I've been biking more and mixing it up, but biking is (IMO) a poor substitute for running. I feel I get a much better all around workout from an hour of running - hills and flats - than a bike ride twice that long - and I don't slouch it. You have all these gears working for you on a bike and you don't work so much on the downhills. With running, especially on the trail, hills, or stairs, I think it helps for getting out in the hills. Love to run but gotta also think longevity.

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went to a spinning class last night to try it out. it was an "okay" workout but nothing like the workout i would get from doing running exercises for the same amount of time.

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My gym just gotta kickass piece of treadmill type equipment that goes up to a 45 degree gradient... Well apparently, I normally just take it to the 22.5 Degree gradient. Nothing like the actual body dynamics of walking up a really steep hill. If anyone is interested I can find out all the details for you to hassle your gym with... Its sweet cos I can do a 30 minute session at lunch and get 600m vertical gain over a 2400m distance... Loving that.

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