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erez

Technical pack for longer trips

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Anyone have reccomendations on a pack in the 4000 cu in. range under 4 lb. I'm looking to do the Ptarmigan traverse and I need something that caries a moderate amount of weight well, but is still light and technical(i.e. tool and crampon storage) enough for climbing.

 

Also, for those who have done the traverse, how big a pack did you take?

 

Thanks!

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I was quick to answer (can't help it... love my pack); I should have asked how many days do you envision doing the traverse in? Expected pack weight? Are you doing the standard peaks or plan to nab a few extras (climb elephant dome!!! hot!)?

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Yeah I love it when I can't crank through the crux moves and am looking at a 30' on a bullshit screw because my 4 lb pack and 2 lb thermarest pumped me out early... but hey at least it feels comfy on my back when I take the ride...

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yelrotflmao.gif

 

I badly wanted an Andinista but couldn't shell out for one. I settled with a Nozone I picked up on clearance and with a gift certificate at Cascade Crags. It's pretty nice but, still an Andinista would be so much nicer for crankin 5.10 in my mountaineering boots.

 

The Nozone would fit your criteria erez but, I've done 3 day trips out of my Khamsin 38 with no problem and it's about 2 lbs lighter.

 

If you want a load hauler and are willing to use the lid as a summit pack, check out my Lowe Alpine Crossbow in the Yard Sale, it will comfortably haul any load you can get into it. thumbs_up.gif

 

Another popular (and cheaper) pack is the Wildthings Ice Sack. I'm pretty sure they were on sale at www.wildthingsgear.com last time I looked.

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the andinista is nice and light, but packs terribly as others have mentioned. It is terrible for skiing. One of the zippers ripped out, and the top pocket divider ripped out too. My friend warrantied a defective ice sac (fabric delaminated) and they basically made him pay for a new one. I would expect more for the price of those things.

 

That said, I have used one for over 3 years and take it when I really want to keep things light. It still packs like crap though. With the zippers compressed, it's like you're wearing a missile.

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Serratus Icefall?

 

Modified Golite Gust (add compression straps & widen hipbelt)

 

mmm.... Turgid Sausage...

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In regards to Wild Things quality issues; I can't say I've seen any evidence of poor workmanship, but the most recent pack I have from them is from 2000 (or 2001?). I own 2 andinistas and an ice sac; climbing partners of mine also have these models around the same year… none of us have had problems with quality. As far as it carrying crappy well it doesn't have a frame; what do you expect? If it feels/handles crappy; lighten the load. I think they handle up to 35 lbs fine (but I'm still young hahaha.gif ). I have noticed that the packs have gained over a pound in weight since my purchase (my ice sac weighs in at 2 lbs 14 oz. for comparison) which makes me wonder what is driving the company now; especially with all these quality concerns.

 

And remember: you get what you pay for.

 

Cold Cold: Yeah... Randy just sent me a valdez... absolutely love it. Beautiful pack.

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Thanks for the info...For those of you who have used cold cold world packs, how do they cary considering they don't have a true frame, just the foam back.

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Depends on if you are an old fart or not...

 

I think they carry fine; but I also think the andinista carries fine. I would say they have a built in audit system: if it hurts you just need to rethink what you are bringing...

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If you are planning on ever carrying skis and boots on a pack, you will need at least a framesheet. Otherwise those 20 pounds will compress the pack and put the load directly on your shoulders. Not an issue for many, but worth thinking about if you ski.

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Actually, I've done some pretty good mileage with my Chernobyl, overloaded, on approaches, and it doesn't get too bad; and I'm 145 lb, 6 foot tall pencil-neck, so if an overloaded pack is going to give anyone trouble, it'll be me. Not the same pack, but the same type of frame.

 

I'd imagine that it'd be okay past the 45 lb mark; a friend of mine has one (a Chaos), and uses it for standard backpacking trips, as well, so I can ask him how his shoulders feel. I know that he doesn't carry "light" either; he packs in the whole house, sometimes.

 

I'll post his response soon.

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I have the Andinista and I like it however I did borrowed my friend Chaos and if I had to do it again I will get the Chaos much better pack IMHO

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I have used the BD Ice Pack for a few year and just upgraded to the Dana Sluskin 45. Not quite 4,000 cu.in. but I have also found if I take a larger pack I tend to pack more stuff. My new Dana has been awesome for Mountaineering, Rock & Ice climbing and backcountry skiing.

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The Cold Cold World packs are my favorites! I have carried fairly heavy loads in them and found them comfortable and very well designed. Granite gear makes some excellent light packs as well, but the Cold Cold World packs are tougher and better made. If you can get everything you need in the Chernobyl that would be best, but if you carrt a lot of stuff then get the Chaos.

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I got my CCW Chernobyl this spring and think it's absolutely perfect. I was able to fit everything I needed for a 9 day trip through the Chilliwacks and Pickets a couple weeks ago and so didn't need to take my older Dana. We carried double ropes, a good sized rack, snow and ice gear, and food for All those days. I can't imagine a non-winter trip where I'd need to carry more.

 

The pack was a total rock star. We had to haul packs twice on the trip and it was easily able to hold up to the abuse. The load was stable on my back through the worst bushwhacks. The pack warmed my legs to mid thigh (I'm 6'2") on bivys planned and unplanned.

 

I looked at a lot of different packs (Granite Gear, Wild things, etc..) and am totally glad I got the Chernobyl. it's perfect

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I have Khamsin 62 (Arcteryx) and this is my day, overnight and extended trip pack. I am happy with this pack but I should buy one 35L pack and try to save this one a little.

Z

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