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K_Y_L_E

MUIR HIKE

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Alright

Here's the deal, I am planning an overnight trip to muir this weekend with a crowd of friends. Most of whom have vast or moderate climbing experience. The most experienced is a "High Pointer" the least experienced have been to base camp at Baker and Shuksan. Well...correction the least experienced would be my Girlfriend who has been running stairs with me and has only a few easy hikes under her belt. she has never hiked with a pack but is in pretty good shape. She is pretty nervous (but determined too), and has been reassured by others in the group that she will be fine. I have been up to 10k or so on Baker and summited Shuksan but have never been to Muir. She is looking to me to tell her if she should go. confused.gif

Does anyone have experiences taking newbies up to Muir? What is the route like is is doable for a newbie? She has the gear. My biggest fear is that she will hate it and never do it again. Next would be that I would have to turn back with her and miss out on boarding/AT (havnt decided yet) the snowfield. Any beta? Reassurances? Warnings?

thanks boys...and girls

bigdrink.gif

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In good weather this is just a hike, nothing more. And far not the best one due to crowds. If it's going to be a weekend you will always be surrounded by people going/skiing both ways. Most likely hut will be crowded with climbers arriving and leaving and cooking and talking all the night - I'd recommend taking a tent.

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I'll second what Alex said. You all will be fine, as long as you don't get f$%&ed by really shitty weather or a whiteout. Ya'll know how to navigate in a w/o, yes? Have fun.

 

Read up or check in with Gator about trail conditions to Muir if you're still worried when you get there. Might want to have flotation available for everyone in the group if it gets precipitation. Alex had a nasty time with soft snow this past weekend on the Kautz - roughly the same elevation and aspect. Read his TR here.

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Last weekend there were 50mph winds Friday and Saturday above Panorama point, but it was calm on Sunday. As a result, snow conditions were mixed--some areas of knee deep powder and other areas of hard windcrust that held my fat ass and pack up. It made movement above Muir and down to Paradise very slow and frustrating.

 

Muir hut was empty Saturday night, but that was probably cause the weather sucked, although there were lots of day hikers coming in and out.

 

I believe that this weekend is the first weekend of the year that RMI starts guiding, so don't expect an alpine experience.

 

Oh yeah, the NPS has done a sweet job with flagging the route up to Muir--wands are about every 25 yards or so above Panorama Point and the boot track before that is too obvious to miss.

 

Gerg

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I took my wife up muir during easter and she snowboarded down...she'd never been above 6000ft and it was only her 3rd time snowboarding. she managed it fine.

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The first time I hiked the Snowfield, when I was 14, I thought I was going to die. The sun was roasting, my legs felt like they weighed 50 pounds each, and no end was in sight. I finally dragged myself up to helicopter pad and collapsed in the dirt, while a six year old child laughed and frolicked past. yellaf.gif

 

I've spent a many a day since then on the Muir Snowfield, and have found that how enjoyable the hike is will depend completely on conditions. Try to avoid the "Snowfield" when it's more of an ice sheet late in the year. And whiteouts are just not fun.

 

It's a fine hike for n00bs, though the altitude may be a problem. I'm sure your gf will keep up, and if not, you can always short-rope her to the RMI cattletrain wink.gif.

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It is a long hill. Nothing technical. But if she has a tendency to whine and is only going because you want her to, tell her it is a gradeVI with a huge storm approaching.

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Good advice! Naw, She really wants to go, she is just a bit nervous despite reassurances. But I will definitely keep an eye on the weather. Bad weather + newbie = madgo_ron.gif GF. And we all remember the mathematical rule that madgo_ron.gif GF = cry.gif man. We dont want that. Besides if she does not have fun I will need to learn to solo. hmmmm........guess that statement could have double meaning yelrotflmao.gif

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With a newbie hiker, you can greatly increase your odds by making sure that you carry as much as possible; i.e. all community gear like tent, cooking stuff, food. Depending on the pride of the newbie hiker it can also be helpful to carry a lot of their personal stuff too if they are open to that. Best not to inform the newbie hiker of that beforehand though as newbie hikers tend to bring way too much personal shit.

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My wife likes it when I bring wine. Now I never hike without it. No more 'solo'.

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Like Mad Dog 20/20 right Bug?

No that will be good. I have a little 12oz bottle of chardonnay. If she makes it to Muir we can celebrate. If not.......I can chug it bigdrink.gif and then let her hit me over the head with the empty bottle cantfocus.gif. Everybody wins!! And yeah ChucK I have a feeling my pack just gained 15 pounds. Oh well, eh?

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My wife likes it when I bring wine. Now I never hike without it. No more 'solo'.

 

I second dat! thumbs_up.gif Cabs, merlots, and syrahs - they's all good! bigdrink.gif

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Don't forget to get your permits- camping at Muir is considered climbing, I think. Oh, and if the weather's bad, smoke in the hut.

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Maybe you should do It as a day trip with no packs first. Just so you are familiar with the route, and she gets a comfort level, knowing that she can make it. Instead of worrying the whole time that she HAS to make it since you are with a group and camping. This may relieve some of the pressure on her. Even better, she will feel like one of the experienced ppl on your trip.

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