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mac37

Nedd Sleeping Bag Recomendations

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I am going to attempt Mt Rainier in early July. I need some advice on a sleeping bag. It is planned as a two day one night climb. Thanks for the advice in advance. If you are selling one I'm interested. Post here or email mcafee37@yahoo.com

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If you are not carrying over, I would recommend something like this: Mountain Hardwear Second Dimension, polarguard 3D, rated to 15F. Inexpensive, and warm enough for July.

 

If you are carrying over, you could probably save a pound by going with a 15-degree down sleeping bag (get one with an exterior made from "epic" water-repellant material.)

Edited by Stephen_Ramsey

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I'd definetly consider the MEC bags, www.mec.ca and the REI bags www.rei.com I've heard a lot of good stuff about the REI sub kilo.

 

I prefer a 20 degree down bag because not only do you save weight on the bag, you save room in your pack allowing for a smaller and lighter backpack to be used (down is more compressable than synthetic). I was able to fit 3 days of crap into my 38 litre pack the last trip up "Raindawg" and trim an additional 1.5 pounds by not carrying my 45 litre pack. I also use a compression sack for my sleeping bag which helps immensly.

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I prefer a 20 degree down bag because not only do you save weight on the bag, you save room in your pack allowing for a smaller and lighter backpack to be used (down is more compressable than synthetic). I was able to fit 3 days of crap into my 38 litre pack the last trip up "Raindawg" and trim an additional 1.5 pounds by not carrying my 45 litre pack. I also use a compression sack for my sleeping bag which helps immensly.

 

On this same trip, I took a 40-deg down bag and was sufficiently warm, even at Thumb Rock (10,800?). Fairly weather dependent, I would say; but, 15-deg or 20-deg is a good general bag anyway.

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I really like Marmot down bags if you were looking for a specific brand. I think bags are by far their best product and they are often on sale.

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I was able to fit 3 days of crap into my 38 litre pack the last trip up "Raindawg" and trim an additional 1.5 pounds by not carrying my 45 litre pack. I also use a compression sack for my sleeping bag which helps immensly.

 

Bronco,

 

Good points. 38 liters, that's impressive packing!

 

Incidentally, that's a surprising weight savings by switching to a pack that was only seven liters smaller. For example, the weight difference between the 50-liter and the 44-liter Black Diamond Ice Pack is only 3 ounces. In the REI line of packs, going from a 65-liter pack to a 75-liter pack only adds 3 ounces of weight to the pack, and so on.

 

But if your 45-liter pack has an internal frame, I could imagine there would be a substantial weight difference...

 

That said, I agree that down is great for the reasons you've pointed out.

 

Cheers,

Steve

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Steven:

 

My 44l BD Ice Pack is listed at 3lbs 9 oz and my 38l Khamsin is listed right at 2 lbs 1 oz. My pack with food and water was around 38 pounds.

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Steven:

 

My 44l BD Ice Pack is listed at 3lbs 9 oz and my 38l Khamsin is listed right at 2 lbs 1 oz. My pack with food and water was around 38 pounds.

Bronco,

 

Good to know. That Khamsin pack sure is light. thumbs_up.gif

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That seems awfully light. Might want to weigh your pack and see....advertised weights are hardly ever right!

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I checked Pro Mountian Sports website (I think they actually weigh the merchandise on their scale) and it shows the short Khamsin 38 as being 2 lbs 9 oz so it looks like Arcteryx is off by half a pound. I wonder what the actual weight of the Ice Pack is?

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I checked Pro Mountian Sports website (I think they actually weigh the merchandise on their scale) and it shows the short Khamsin 38 as being 2 lbs 9 oz so it looks like Arcteryx is off by half a pound. I wonder what the actual weight of the Ice Pack is?

Hey Bronco,

 

Even at 2 lbs 9 oz, that is still a darn good weight savings as compared to the 44L Ice Pack. thumbs_up.gif

 

Do you have the short or the regular size Khamin 38 pack? I'm a short guy (5'6") and wondering which would be better.

 

FWIW, the Ice Pack's weight is pretty close to what BD quotes on their web site. One cool thing about the Ice Pack is the integrated pad. It is comfy enough that I usually just sleep on my empty pack and on the rope, which saves on the weight of a ridge-rest pad. I doubt that saves a full pound, however...

 

wave.gif

 

(Sorry to drift the thread).

 

Thanks,

Steve

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BD is very accurate with their advertised weights I have found (have digital scale) so I'd be the Ice Pack is "as advertised". Mountain Hardwear and Marmot on the other hand....

 

I've done fine with a 30 degree down bag (Mountainsmith Wisp, 1.5 lbs) on Rainier (of course it was all I had at the time so I didn't have a choice). It depends on how warm you sleep normally though. If you are going to buy a multi-use bag, then something in the 20-30 degree is a good choice, IMO.

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Steve:

 

I'm 5'8" (and a half!) and have the Short size. It fits good. I think my 3/4 ridge rest is 9 oz, so the weight savings are down to only about 1/2 pound. Hmmmm...

 

To the original poster on this thread, you should do a search in the "gear critic" for sleeping bags. You'll get more info than you want.

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I'd recommend getting my REI Killimanjaro 0 degree Bag I have FS in the gear forum. It only weighs in around 5lbs, and does not compress what so ever. Perfect for those long alpine routes grin.gif

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Speaking of light packs, I have one for sale on the Yard Sale board. It is a large which fits 5'9" and up but if you are looking at new packs the smaller sizes are worth looking at. Mine can go down to 16 oz with a web un-padded belt. It is made with spectra threads as the ripstop in a light nylon. I have used it for two years now and it still looks new. The one I am selling has only been used once or twice. My Rainier solo pack with 80 meter 9mm, one picket, tent and stove, weighs 37 pounds.

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20 degree and sleep in your clothing and jackets if you need more. You won't be sleeping much anyway with a typical alpine start on a 2 day climb, ya know?

 

Used sleeping bags from climbers?=frickin' nasty,dude! thumbs_down.gif

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Speaking of light packs, I have one for sale on the Yard Sale board. It is a large which fits 5'9" and up but if you are looking at new packs the smaller sizes are worth looking at. Mine can go down to 16 oz with a web un-padded belt. It is made with spectra threads as the ripstop in a light nylon. I have used it for two years now and it still looks new. The one I am selling has only been used once or twice. My Rainier solo pack with 80 meter 9mm, one picket, tent and stove, weighs 37 pounds.

Not that anyone cares, but that is an 80 foot rope, not 80 meters. I don't need to lassoo the summit. Just protect ugly bridges.

And to stick to the thread, I use a 20 degree bag in june. I wear my pile and throw my down coat over the top of my bag. I tend to sleep warm anyway but this arrangement has always kept me toasty on Rainier in June. I've never been on it after June.

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DUSTIN

 

What is your opinion of the Mountainsmith bags?

 

I love my Mountainsmith bag. It is true to the advertised weight (26 ozs w/ stuff sac for size long) and packs down impressively small. It might be closer to a 35 degree bag instead of a true 30 degree bag. I was pretty cold in it one September night when it was 28-30 degrees and I was close to neked. I always wear at least a long under top when I sleep now! On Rainier last June it got down to ~27-28 degrees and I was fine. Great bag, I highly recommend it.

 

The downside is that its spendy for a 30 degree bag, $270. You might also consider their sub two pound 15-degree version (can't remember what its called, 'vision' maybe). Depends on what you're looking for. thumbs_up.gif

Edited by Dustin_B

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for what it's worth, I use a zero degree bag on Rainier, but I've climbed in Aug and Sept and spent a few nights at the summit. I sleep a little cold and really appreciate the extra luxury; I got really tired of being cold in my 20 degree bag.

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for what it's worth, I use a zero degree bag on Rainier, but I've climbed in Aug and Sept and spent a few nights at the summit. I sleep a little cold and really appreciate the extra luxury; I got really tired of being cold in my 20 degree bag.
Sleeping bags are probably the hardest thing to give advice about because some people sleep warm while others sleep cold. I sleep toasty warm in my old REI 20 degree bag when it's 15 degrees out. If you are not already sleeping in all your clothes, then you are carrying more bag weight than you need to. I used a 40 degree bag on Rainier last July at Emmons Flat and was plenty warm. I used the 20 degree bag at Muir Hut in February and again was plenty warm to the point of having to take clothes off.

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