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JoshK

New Zealand

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Dru said:

 

hey fern didn't you climb aspiring?

 

 

no I did Tyndall on the other side of the valley. All

the rock in that area is terrible. Stick to snow routes.

After a day of hiking on a ridge top with a cross-wind blowing

over the rock slabs I was all sparkly from the tiny rock

chips that got blown onto me. cantfocus.gif

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JoshK said:

Does anybody have any good information on some fairly non-technical climbing opportunties in New Zealand? It looks like I am going there for the month of January with my father. We plan on doing some of the hut trail hikes, but I think it would be fun to get in a summit or two as well. He is very fit, but isn't a technical climber, so scrambles or easy glacier climbs would be what we are looking for.

 

thanks for any info,

-josh

wtf ? isn't it "non technical climbing" called scrambing or hiking? rolleyes.gif. try to contact Chris Koziarz, he was there last month. check lonely planet guide, there is a lot of info there (about hiking).

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Notes on Aspiring:

 

Definitely not "non-technical" -- there is some considerable glacier travel to be had, more or less depending on if you fly in to the Collin Todd Hut or not -- but the NW Ridge is a good route that is largely free of the objective hazard I described seeing on Cook.

 

The "must do route" on Aspiring, in my opinion, is the SW Ridge route -- though conditions can make it bleak, as I found it last year.

 

I have done the NW Ridge (on another trip) and highly recommend the entire alpine experience (plus it's closer to 4000 feet from the hut to Aspiring summit than 6000 feet from the plateau hut to Cook's summit).

 

I love the Aspiring Region, though it doesn't quite pack the glaciated punch that Plateau does.

 

S bigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifcheeburga_ron.gif

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HI there,

 

This is a reply to a post that someone put up asking about climbing things to do in New Zealand in January.

 

I am a member of The New Zealand Alpine Club and I received an Email the other day with guided things to do, I have cut and pasted these things below. I am not hwking membership to the NEw Zealand Alpine club but if you're spending the money to go to NZ, the NZ$100 or so is a cheap price to pay to get hooked in quickly (Its about US$60 I think) I included the contact phone numbers below, but to reduce the possibility of SPAM, I have removed the email addresses, sorry.

 

Also, IF you are looking for a guide that will take you anywhere you want to go, Lydia Bradey is an excellent choice, I was one of her first clients some years ago, and you can't go wrong having hiring her for your time in New Zealand. Contact her at:

 

http://www.brassmonkeybivouac.com/

 

IF I Wasn't in Spain beating my head against office walls right now, I would surely love to get on some New Zealand Glacier, I envy you!

 

NZ ALPINE CLUB NOTES:

UPCOMING TRIPS AND INSTRUCTION:

December 6 to 8.

Pro Multi-Pitch Adventure Rockclimbing Course, Twin Streams Aoraki Mount Cook National Park. Cost: $250

Learn the skills to undertake long committing rock climbs efficiently and safely in an inspiring environment. Based at Twin Streams, access by helicopter from Glentanner (flight included in course price), walk out on Monday afternoon. The course Instructor will be Dave Brash from Dunedin, a professional rock climbing instructor and editor of Dunedin Rock. There are only four

student places available, participants must be NZAC members and payment must be received in full by the National Office to secure a place. To get the most

out of this course you should have some experience leading and placing natural pro to grade 16-17. Contact either the National Office in Christchurch, or Dave

Brash, 03 473 9970, 027 222 1195,

 

National Instruction Programme 2003-2004

The Instruction courses will provide intermediate-advanced instruction to Club members at subsidised rates. Numbers limited. Full details in the Autumn

edition of Climber or call Richard Wesley 377 7595

Intermediate- Advanced Mountaineering (Five Days) $950

 

3-7 January 2004 , and 10-14 January 2004 Unwin Hut Mt Cook NZAC Annual climbing camp

January 2004 NZAC National Annual Climbing Camp Hopkins Valley Next year’s camp is to be held based out of Elcho Hut in the Hopkins Valley, a fantastic area right next door to the Mt Cook/Aoraki area, but without the

pressure of tourism. The valley provides easy access to a variety of difficulties of mountain routes and also has some excellent rock climbing, including a 16-pitch

crux grade 16 on Mt Hopkins east ridge and plenty of easier stuff. There are extensive tramping possibilities and, due to the valley aspect of the camp, supporters will also be able to access this camp, making for not only a great chance to get some climbing in but also for non-climbing partners and families to participate in the great mountain atmosphere. To find out more you can visit our

website page and look under 'Activities', 'Climbing Camps'. www.alpineclub.org.nz A registration fee of $25 will be charged to cover basic admin costs, with possible 4WD all the way to Elcho being charged based on

cost. For those interested in attending this camp, please contact the National Office

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glassgowkiss said:

JoshK said:

Does anybody have any good information on some fairly non-technical climbing opportunties in New Zealand? It looks like I am going there for the month of January with my father. We plan on doing some of the hut trail hikes, but I think it would be fun to get in a summit or two as well. He is very fit, but isn't a technical climber, so scrambles or easy glacier climbs would be what we are looking for.

 

thanks for any info,

-josh

wtf ? isn't it "non technical climbing" called scrambing or hiking? rolleyes.gif. try to contact Chris Koziarz, he was there last month. check lonely planet guide, there is a lot of info there (about hiking).

 

I think a moderate glacier route could be considered non-technical climbing, at least in my book.

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There is a brewery tour you can go on in the westland region of south island, the beer is called Monteith's, IIRC the brewery is in Greymouth.... anyways you get a free beer if you take the tour bigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifbigdrink.gif

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Dru said:

There is a brewery tour you can go on in the westland region of south island, the beer is called Monteith's, IIRC the brewery is in Greymouth.... anyways you get a free beer if you take the tour

Monteith's original ain't bad. If you don't want to get funny looks drink Speight's.

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My wife and I climbed both Cook (via Zurbriggen's, descended the Linda) and Aspiring (SW ridge) last year on our honeymoon (late December 2002) and had a great time. We climbed Aspiring as a warm-up and I think It is a good mountain to head to to get a feel for New Zealand climbing. Even that early, the SW ridge was starting to get spicy near the top with a little bit of mixed rock and ice to ~60 degrees. We descended the NW ridge and that seemed to be pretty much a scramble except for some steep snow descending the "ramp". We round tripped it from the French Ridge hut which made for a long day, but oh so beautiful!

 

Mount Cook lived up to it's reputation and scared us a bit. We witnessed a ice chunk the size of a house rip down the Gunbarrels and proceed to plow its way down most of the Linda Glacier. We moved quickly after that! That said, the area is probably one of the more spectacular I've visited and it is worth heading to, even if you only climb Mt. Dixon and/or walk around the Plateau hut. We flew in and didn't regret it (a heli can haul a lot of tasty food!), mainly after hiking out and realizing what slog it would be going UP! The hike out is not for the faint of heart, though. We came very close to getting shoved over a cliff by an avalanche (we left early, but the snow didn't freeze overnight), and large rocks were falling out of the moraine wall and bowling down the exit gully. Needless to say, we realized why most fly in AND out. Still I though it was cool, mainly to get an idea of how huge a mountain Cook really is.

 

I would also reccomend Castle Hill (amazing bouldering/surreal wandering), and second Dru's reccomendation for Mt. Owen. An amazing karst landscape complete with a cool six bunk hut. The east ridge of Taranaki was a fun scramble, as was the MacPherson-Talbot traverse in the Darrans. Pretty much I could spend every winter in New Zealand (This topic took me back mentally). . . but I'd better get back to work!

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After looking at the mountain most of the day, I'll second that it isn't a walk in the park. I'll post a photo when I get back. Ireally like the Monlieth bigdrink.gif

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Over 200 climbers have died in the park. There's a memorial not to far from the Hermitage to some of them - sobering. Creepiest was the 4 who died when the hut they were sleeping in blew away hellno3d.gif

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hellno3d.gif Otago University researcher Dr Murray Malcolm found there were 1.87 deaths for every 1000 days spent climbing. hellno3d.gif

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If you go to Mt. Cook region, do the Ball Pass route. Starting in the village, hike up the east side of the Hooker glacier, and then up. Bivy up in high basin with amazing views of La Perouse, S. Face of Hicks, and Mt. Cook. Then head over the pass to crazy views of the 2000m Caroline Face of Mt. Cook and the Tasman glacier. The only bummer is the dusty walk back down the Tasman to the village, although you can surely arrange to have someone from the village pick you up. Ice axe and crampons are all that is required.

 

Compared to the Copeland pass route, you won't see any crowds, and this has the advantage of being a loop from Mt. Cook village -- it also takes you closer to the heart of the range.

 

A dayhike from the village up to the Mueller hut is a good warmup -- a few minor peaks can be scrambled from there.

 

Otherwise, a nice place for moderate alpine highcountry is Nelson Lakes National Park.

 

Finally, I would also recommend doing at least one non "Great Walks" trip -- you might actually meet some New Zealanders "spending a few days in the bush" rather than just Germans. It takes a bit more research (talk to locals in ourdoor shops, etc.), but is really well worth it.

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cj001f said:

hellno3d.gif Otago University researcher Dr Murray Malcolm found there were 1.87 deaths for every 1000 days spent climbing. hellno3d.gif

Two deaths for every three years of climbing?

How the heck does an office-wank from Spain manage to find this thread on this little website?

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Pencil_Pusher said:

cj001f said:

hellno3d.gif Otago University researcher Dr Murray Malcolm found there were 1.87 deaths for every 1000 days spent climbing. hellno3d.gif

Two deaths for every three years of climbing?

How the heck does an office-wank from Spain manage to find this thread on this little website?

That's according to here:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay.cfm?storyID=3538844&thesection=news&thesubsection=general

Apparently one of the Latvians had summited all 7 summits:

http://www.everestnews.com/4002expcoverage/asadday12092003.htm

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Just got off the return plane flight...........borrrrrrring. But last week there were 5 rescues (mostly injures from falling ice) and 4 deaths on Mt. Cook over the course of 4 days. hellno3d.gif

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