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Ursa_Eagle

Hot tub after strenuous workout

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I looked through the other thread, but it didn't really answer my question. I've heard that going in a hot tub after a really strenuous workout is a bad thing. Is this true? And if so, what's the threshold on how strenuous a workout needs to be before you shouldn't be going into the hot tub? How can you tell?

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First, let's say this: assmonkey isn't a doctor. This is not advice.

 

After I work out at the gym (a real gym, not a climbing gym), I take a cold rinse in the shower, and soak for a few minutes in the tub. I stay in the tub only to raise my core temp a bit, no more than 8 minutes. Then, I hop out and rinse in the coldest shower I can get out of the wall. Sometimes if I am feeling especially perky, I repeat.

 

The effect, as I understand it, is that the skin tempature is quickly lowered, thus stimulating blood flow. This is a good thing, as it "washes" away all the by-products left over in your muscles from your workout. The net effect is that you recover sooner, thus you can workout again sooner, and get stronger faster. If I remember correctly, Twight mentions a process like this briefly in his book, and people have been doing hot-tub-to-snow-plunge like things since the beginning of time.

 

As far as when you shouldn't get into a tub, I dunno. If you think you are going to pass out form your workout, it's probably not a good idea (and your workout is probably ineffective, too). If you have a weak heart, it's probably not a good idea. On a more personal note, I think that long sessions in the tub should be augmented with Bud Light and bikini briefs. The bikini briefs really help to show off assmonkey's johnson.

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http://www.turnstep.com/Faq/sauna.html

And for those of yo to LZ to click the link.

 

Should I use a steam, sauna or hot tub right after a workout?

Since the blood tends to pool in your extremities after a vigorous workout, and steams, saunas, hot tubs and even hot showers tend to dilate your blood vessels, it is really not the best thing to do as it will be more difficult for the blood to reach the heart and brain. However, if you've done a thorough aerobic cool-down, and you wait a reasonable amount of time to return to almost normal, you might go into one of these "fun" things. But if you feel any sign of weakness or dizziness, get out immediately.

 

 

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