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Ideas on cleaning a pack?

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I dont know if this has been brought up before, but is there an easy homebased way of cleaning a pack, like the outside, funk and the shoulder straps that the snaffles like. Hose or hiking in a rainstorm has worked in the past, but its been a dry year-any better ideas?. Geek_em8.gif

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use a front-loading washing machine like for sleeping bags. down at the laundromat if you dont have one at home.

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I scrub mine down with some soap and a big scrub brush in the tub.

 

I guess Dru's method would work if you took the stays and framesheet out, but the tub method just takes a few minutes.

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When someone discovers the majick method for removing the scent of cat pee from a pack, please PM me or post. Also, if someone needs a cat, let me know.

 

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olyclimber said:

When someone discovers the majick method for removing the scent of cat pee from a pack, please PM me or post. Also, if someone needs a cat, let me know.

 

Haven't been cleaning the litter box, have you? yellaf.gif I've long ago learned to hang up high any items I'm drying outside or bring into the house that smell like good old Mother Earth: tents, ropes, backpacks, sleeping bags. I normally clean packs and such using M-Lou's tub method, but in the few instances when a cat has struck, the front-load washing machine--cold-water wash, regular soap, extra rinse--does the trick. Pet stores have some topical cleaners, also an Off!-type spray, but I've never used those.

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olyclimber said:

When someone discovers the majick method for removing the scent of cat pee from a pack, please PM me or post. Also, if someone needs a cat, let me know.

 

Some dry cleaners have a special treatment available. A few phone calls should yield some good info.

 

 

PS...I'll take your cat. I LOVE cats.......in gravy.

Edited by Thinker

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ClimbingCowboy said:

Is this the same cat that pee'd on your pack?

 

No, of course not. That cat is not available that this time. I swear it isn't the same cat. yellaf.gif

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Thinker said:

olyclimber said:

When someone discovers the majick method for removing the scent of cat pee from a pack, please PM me or post. Also, if someone needs a cat, let me know.

 

Some dry cleaners have a special treatment available. A few phone calls should yield some good info.

 

 

PS...I'll take your cat. I LOVE cats.......in gravy.

 

I wouldn't recommend dining on this particular cat. I think it has a bloodline relation to a pole cat or some other scented feline. yellaf.gif There is the strange story of how its mother went missing for a few months up in Bellingham, and then showed up in my closet one day having kittens...and this one picked me out. Anyway, my son seems to like it, so unfortunately for all of you...this cat giveaway business is all in jest.

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I'd say don't wash your pack, let the rain do the trick. I washed mine once and then spent forever sewing up the stitching that came out as a result. Dental floss seems to work well for this task.

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What'd you wash it with, concrete driveway cleaner? If washing the pack caused the stitching to fall apart, then it was probably (prolly?) pretty worn out already. I'd use something like woolite, or the stuff they sell for washing sleeping bags, and let it hang dry in the open air for a couple of days.

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Inspired by this thread, I went out and bought a bottle of Woolite (on sale at Bartells) and scrubbed my old Kelty Glacier Peak pack, which I've been using for well over a decade, and which has as long as I can remember has been redolent of that macho fragrance of old sweat, bug juice, and sunscreen.

I scrubbed it pretty well with a brush, squeezed the soapy water in the padded shoulder straps and waist belt, rinsed the whole thing off (boy did the water get dirty!) and hung it upside down to dry under cover on the deck. Now we wait.

No problems with seams coming loose, that I could see. If you used bleach, I think that might cause some sorts of thread to dissolve?

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For cleaning urine and other similar stinky stuff (vomit) you need an enzyme cleaner. The enzymes eat and destroy the source. I have a bottle under the sink at home, but I bet "enzyme cleaner" in google will work.

 

I kill cats that spray urine! That is the worst smell in the world!

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I wouldn't worry about losing stitching with the bathtub method. The washer method, well, it would be harder on the pack.

 

Woolite is great stuff. I use it for my sleeping bags too, and it's what the IDFL down people think is best.

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I'll second David Parker's enzyme killer idea.

I've tried soap, lysol, basically everything under my sink.

 

Stick the cat in the sprayed pack and close the lid for a few hours. It might not stop the spraying, but it might make you feel better.

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