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glassgowkiss

Jofree

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Which descent did you use? NW glacier, or south side buttress? I don't have the guide in front of me, so please pardon any route name inaccuracies.

 

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hey hardman bob how come you had to retreat back up australian gully? people ski that shit eh? boxing_smiley.gif

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glassgowkiss said:

joffree has some of the best neve conditions i have ever seen right now. go do it. easy target right now

 

Ooooh yes! The Central Couloir was squeeky and neve-licious this weekend for all but the last two hundred feet which were fluted and yukon-orrific with a tricky cornice reminiant to gain the summit.

 

Of course it's raining now but you never know, might get another window soon.

 

Ade

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The descent down the SE ridge served up a full serving of suck, though, about 1,500 feet of down front-pointing on more perfect neve. We made one rap from just above the shoulder as darkness fell, though parties ahead of us had downclimbed while it was still light out.

 

a tricky cornice reminiant

hey ade, is a tricky reminiant some kind of wily cow?

 

 

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forrest_m said:

The descent down the SE ridge served up a full serving of suck, though, about 1,500 feet of down front-pointing on more perfect neve. We made one rap from just above the shoulder as darkness fell, though parties ahead of us had downclimbed while it was still light out.

 

a tricky cornice reminiant

hey ade, is a tricky reminiant some kind of wily cow?

 

 

And parties behind us bivvied and didn't get back to the hut until gone 5am. Another helping of suck that I was glad not to consume.

 

A Tricky Ruminant is indeed a large angry even-toed hoffed animal (so camels, and giraffes also count). Only found on the slopes of Mt Jofree and other regions with exceptionally low literacy rates, like CC.com. As opposed to a remanent, which is something entirely different.

 

Ruminant, remanent... I'm going to have to contemplate this some more.

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Nice work on the climb guys.

 

Was there any ice to be had or just neve?

 

Why didnt you descend the Australian Couloir instead of the tedious ridge?

 

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Climzalot said:

Was there any ice to be had or just neve?

 

lots of ice around, on the slabs down low, even down at the road, anywhere where there's normally running water. but up high it's been too cold and nothing is melting enough to form water ice. but what do you mean "just" neve? neve rules!

 

Why didnt you descend the Australian Couloir instead of the tedious ridge?

 

um... we're not too smart? the book calls the SE ridge an easy walkoff, and it leads down much closer to the hut. also, there were tracks from earlier in the day leading down and we knew that the makers had done the descent before. if i had it to do over again, i probably would choose the aussie couloir.

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Sorry Forrest, I meant ice on the route. On the Twisting Couloir there were a few short steps of water ice and i was wondering if there was a bit more on the Central or if it was mostly neve like the Twisting. Dont get me wrong, neve does rule, especially 2000 flawless feet of it in a nice position.

 

I asked about the descent because we took the Aussie and it was pretty quick and very harmless. Looking back up at the SE Ridge on the walk by made me very glad we didnt go that way. Looked, well, tedious I guess.

 

Nice work man.

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nice pictures. looks like you guys enjoyed the same nice conditions we had on the mountain. australian colouir is the way to go to get off this peak. it was kind of cold when we did it and we were on the face quite early in the morning (we were on the top @10:45), so i don't think i took pictures while climbing. i think i have some summit shots. i should have some pictures next week.

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Has anyone been up there in winter?

 

What's the approach like? You ski from the road directly, rather than taking the FS road up but how long/hard is it? I'm a very crappy skier.

 

A lot of the terrain up there looks like it presents a considerable avie hazard. Is it worse/better than might be expected?

 

Has anyone here climbed it in winter?

 

Cheers,

 

Ade

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ade,

 

there is a parking area on the main highway across from the mouth of the valley - you'll see the plowed area, and there are almost always cars there. you ski directly across the valley, not too far or too long. the best terrain in the lower valley for skiing lies on the E side (NOT the steeper W side taken by the summer trail). this runs thru a series of open glades (swamps in summer). cross to the W side about where the valley draining the NE face enters the main valley if you headed for routes on the NE face; otherwise, it's best in most snow conditions to stay on the E side and to ski all the way around the toe of the ridge, then come at the cabin from the SE, rather than trying to get up the very steep "nose" of the ridge following the summer trail.

maybe 2hrs (3 or 4 hrs in deep snow) to the cabin.

 

avvy conditions are what u wld expect anywhere in the mtns in winter. the area gets less snow than more-coastal places, and has a reputaion for being fairly stable. there is a LOT of backcountry skiing that takes place in the area, so it gets sussed out pretty well - anybody skiing there will have pitted some of the slopes.

 

matier gets climbed a fair amount in winter, from the col at the head of anniversary glacier. joffre is a bit steeper, but the australian couloir (on the SW face) gets done regularly, then skied!!! i've heard of very little true winter climbing on the NE face - you need to get good weather to coincide with good conditions, which is not easy.

 

there is a reasonably sheltered bivy site below the face (just left of the number 51 on page 219 of "alpine select"), or you can bivy on the prow right of that same numeral (safer if the weather craps out overnite). it'll take 5 or 6hrs from the car to reach the bivy - i've failed in there a cpl times...

 

bruce kay and greg foweraker climbed the flavelle-lane route in winter a few years back, and guy edwards and (i forget who???) did the gully between that route and the central pillar a cpl winters back - i seem to recall one bivy on the route. the various gullies have probably been climbed, but i don't have specifics, and few people do this kind of stuff in true winter!

 

i climbed the complete N ridge, all the way from the high point on the highway immediately E of the joffre lakes parking lot, in winter quite a few years ago. one day to treeline - snowshoeing, not skiing, up thru bluffy forested terrain. then a fine day to the top and back to the road on mostly easy terrain, with 3 or 4 ropelengths belayed, and one them - at the midridge notch - quite hard. a great outing, i thought. i've also done the ridge in winter from joffre lakes, which includes all the same technical sections high on the ridge, but i prefer the full ridge rather than slogging up the valley. see page 214 in A/S.

 

enjoy, cheers, don

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'twas guy and john mckim millar who climbed Smell the Roses M7 in late winter or early spring 2002.

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just watch the snow at the base of the NE face. there is a vast avalanche potential up there. entire glacier was littered with huge avalanche debris! also some bad slopes under the SE face, so know the conditions.

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