Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
Cpt.Caveman

My favorite this weekend photo (share) part 2

Recommended Posts

trask said:

heh timmy, isn't that Baby Orca? yelrotflmao.gif

 

I do believe that is true Trask

 

And DRU.... THAT IS SO TEX tongue.gif that is his summer uniform wink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a photo of the view toward Whitechuck Mountain from Circle Peak, a former lookout site up the Suiattle River area. Also great views of Chaval and many other peaks. Great hike/scramble.

5a1a559900a8a_250284-whitehorsefromcirclepeak.jpg.004ec254b917252b9e59b469e9834018.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
klenke said:

Here's my entry: Mt. Triumph

 

Jeeez! That is bare. I was out there this time last year and we were able to walk acroass a bunch/most(?) of the glacier, but it doesn't look like you can do that now. I'll have to grab a picture from last year and post it for comparison.

 

Everything I have seen personally or in pictures is dryer, bare and more clean of snow or glacier than I have ever seen it.... hellno3d.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tod: we did have to go across small parts of the glacier but not really those parts you can see in the photo. We definitely needed our aluminum crampons for the crossings.

 

Most of the lower glacier crevasses are no more than 15 feet deep. You can see the slab at the base of the cracks, making the crevasses seem more like low angle schrunds or snow fissures. There aint much blue ice, that's for sure.

 

The glacier is so thin where we crossed it that you could often hear thunks and bumps of the various blocks as they settled or moved slightly on the slabs. I doubt many of these were due to our weight. The thunks and bumps were disconcerting at times--especially on the return when I stopped right under a big block to put my crampons on.

 

As we were on the NE Ridge, we could often hear a ruckus down on the glacier. It was so noisy, we were sure we'd easily spot the source of the commotion. Yet, as we would discover by squinting, the noise was emanating from very small ice block "avalanches," not some big serac tumbling. God only knows how loud it would have been had a big serac or ice block tumbled down the slabs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not technically last weekend, but my last trip:

nose_p3.jpg

 

unfortunately, we didn't get too much farther.. cry.gif

fruit.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×