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Doug_Hutchinson

Best gloves for skiin' in the rain?

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Last year really brought home the need to get a better glove system for the "white rain" days. I have owned lots of goretex shell gloves but they all wet out pretty quickly in the rain, even with goretex-lined inner gloves.

 

Anyone have a good glove system? Neoprene? Some cool synthetic? How about even leather? Gets totally wet but with the right lining may be better that limp, wet nylon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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vinylove, baby!

 

get them at the fishermans supply stores. of course, if its warm enough to be raining, you can probably ski barehanded . the russian cross country ski team would make it a point to ski barehanded as much as possible back when i was living at the OTC.

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Nothing short of Nylon plastic or latex will keep your hands dry and those just cause you to sweat out the insides anyway. I gave up a while ago on dry gloves and just went with somthing that stills keeps them warm. OR Grippers have served me well.

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I have used neoprene dive gloves for ice climbing on very wet climbs and for skiing in the rain. The biggest problem with the system is that once they get wet it's best to leave them on for the remainder of the day. If you take them off they get cold very quickly and take a bit to warm up again.

 

Jason

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I have had good results with OR mitts, but still prefer skiing with gloves. I applied Seamgrip to a pair of BD Guide gloves. Did every seam, inside and out –took days to do. It helped, but they still soak thru eventually. IME, multiple pairs of cheap ski gloves are the best solution.

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As others have pointed out, there really is no sure-fire way of keeping your hands dry when its wet out. That being said, I have a couple pairs of windstopper gloves from BDEL that I use biking and climbing/skiing. My hands rarely get cold in them.

 

I hear schoeller gloves are a nice alternative and less bulky then the windstopper. CLoudveil is supposed to have some decent ones I plan on trying out.

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Dachsteins!!! although you will probably need

to sew on a leather patch on the palms, I find

the wool slips on my ski-pole grips a bit.

They worked for Shackelton.

 

 

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fern said:

Dachsteins!!! although you will probably need

to sew on a leather patch on the palms, I find

the wool slips on my ski-pole grips a bit.

They worked for Shackelton.

 

But they clump up with snow and freeze your hands.

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I've been using these OR nylon mittens. I've never had a problem and for all but the coldest days your natural body heat will supply enough warmth that you won't need anything else. A definite plus is that they are pretty much the cheapest glove that OR makes.

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I have been happy skiing in the BD Drytool Glove. Mabye wear a real thin liner underneath for extra warmth.

 

As far as I'm concerned nothing will keep you dry. I think the Neoprene/scholler type materials stay pretty warm when wet.

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