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Dan_Larson

Wand Length

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Freedom of the hills says 30-48" for wands. I just bought 200 36" bamboo sticks for wand construction and am wondering if I should take them back and get the 48"ers.These are for a rainier climb next week.Concerned about the deep snow and how much wand will be left after planted..Thanks, dan

[ 12-28-2001: Message edited by: Dan Larson ]

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Dan,

I think length is a personal matter, and is dependent on depth of insertion. In your case diameter is highly important, so as to insure the fit is properly snug

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quote:

Originally posted by Kathy:
Dan,

I think length is a personal matter, and is dependent on depth of insertion. In your case diameter is highly important, so as to insure the fit is properly snug

Hey Dan, you tiger, may we call you Kathy's Clown? I suppose I should read this post more carefully, but you've decided on 48" as your wand length? I assume you're talking about some kind of "remodeling project" (what do they call it, an "add-a-dick-to-me"?). Let me know how it goes. Big Lou ain't gonna be the only one making tri-tracks on the Muir Snow Field!

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Seriously though do you think It is necessary to go with the 48"ers or will the 36" suffice. C'mon seriously.

[ 12-30-2001: Message edited by: Dan Larson ]

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Dan,

Go with 36", the 24" ones are too short and the 48" are hard to manage in most packs. Also, IMHO go with a dark color, like the dark green ones, and for the flag use red duct tape, this will stay on better. In a whiteout you want something to contrast the white background. Take alot of wands, placing every rope length or so. If it is a whiteout on the way back, snowing (filling in steps up) you can send out the lead person and fan out to find the next wand, while the last person keeps the first wand in sight, like in somecases 20'.

Size dosen't matter, it is how you use it.

TTT

grin.gif" border="0grin.gif" border="0grin.gif" border="0grin.gif" border="0grin.gif" border="0shocked.gif" border="0

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Agreed with TTT. 36" is enough. The dark bamboo sticks with colored duct tape work great. Some people like to mark them with initials so you can be sure you are following the right ones on the way down.

Try to save them for above the ledges, but also make sure you can get down from Muir in a whiteout.

-Loren

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The pre-made wands at REI are a f--king rip off!!Go with the 36" wands for lower 48 climbing and savethe 48" for AK and the Yukon. Don't just wrap a pieceof tape around them either; look in Freedom of theHills, to see how they make them. Also, don't usesurveyors tape, as it gets brittle and breaks, whenit gets cold; go to a fabric store and get a yardof fluorescent orange rip-stop fabric, to make yourflags out of. You then split the top of the wand,slide the flag down the split, wrap it around onehalf at least once and then use a little duct tapeto close the top of the wand back together. Now youwill have wands that you can use over and over again,where the other methods are more disposable. Theonly other suggestion that was true, was buy thegreen bamboo and not the tan(it is much more visable).Touche' Kathy! [big Drink]

[ 12-30-2001: Message edited by: Richard Pumpington ]

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If you're really considering taking that many wands you might want to consider a GPS. I'm not a big fan of gizmos in the mountains but a GPS can save you carrying a lot of wands. That way you only have to wand the really tricky bits and use the GPS to get between the wanded sections.

Ade

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Wands hmm... ya know I've never placed a wand. I've taken advantage of other peoples wands. As far as I'm concerned wands are for suckers, so it's good to see Dan Larson using them cause he really really sucks. [Moon][Moon][Moon]

I think Ade is on the right track.... seriously grin.gif" border="0

[ 12-31-2001: Message edited by: AlpineK ]

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Lotta things can affect a GPS, from limited visibility of the sky in a crack or canyon, to frozen batteries. Even at best you won't get the accuracy you need to negotiate a crevasse field unless your running differential.

Don't get me wrong, I have an etrex Summit that's worth it's weight in gold, but wouldn't even think of heading into the backcountry without effective back-up to the gadget.

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quote:

Originally posted by Ade:

That way you only have to wand the really tricky bits and use the GPS to get between the wanded sections.


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Thanks all . 150-36" wands, GPS, Compass, Map . I think it is all covered.Glad to see you made it through the holidays Alpine K.I see the Christmas truce is over...Happy New year

[ 01-01-2002: Message edited by: Dan Larson ]

[ 01-01-2002: Message edited by: Dan Larson ]

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If you take 2 people, side by side, one an expertwith GPS and one an expert w/ map,compass,altimeterand wands; there are no weak links in the analogsystem! Not affected by canyons/ravines,cold,nobatteries to die or spares to carry,no fragile orunpredictable electronics: analog, when utilizedin an educated manner, is fool-proof. Any systemthat utilizes batteries needs to be eliminated fromthe mountaineering/climbing system, as much as possible(headlamp the 1 unavoidable item).It's lighter too!If you have to use a GPS, you would be a fool to goout without the "old school" way, to bail your assout. GPS is NOT a replacement, for the map,compass,altimeter and wands.

frown.gif" border="0

[ 01-01-2002: Message edited by: Richard Pumpington ]

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I've never placed a wand, never used a GPS, and I've never been lost on a glacier.

Bullshit just weights you down.

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quote:

Originally posted by Richard Pumpington:
Special "K",

Sounds like you carry plenty of SHIT around withyou; You've probably never climbed a big mountaineither!
[Moon][Moon][Moon][Moon]

Right pal. Whatever! [laf]

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Heh Special K-

With your attitude, I just hope you don't get too upset if no one comes lookin' for your lost ass someday. [Mental note to trask...Never climb with k]

Good luck, dude...you're gonna need it.

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