Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
iain

telemarking

Recommended Posts

okay so I'm thinking of trying some telemarking to try something new besides at skiing. I want to use it as very light dependable gear, the way tele gear is intended (not as fake, heavy, poor-performing alpine gear, as it seems to be now) grin.gif . I have acquired a friend's old leather asolo extreme pros and am wondering what boards I could reasonably consider driving with these things. I will probably get some voile 3pin cables. I have some tua mito 192's. I weigh in between 180-195 depending on the season. Am I asking too much of the leather boots? Will I fall on my face constantly and get really frustrated? Or will I adopt telemark technique with some ease from my alpine skiing endeavours? Have others made this transition? I'm looking forward to the challenge. Spray on pinheads! wave.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

actually screw it I'm getting some piste pipes and hammerheads so I can land switch in my t1's and impress the hot snowboard chicas at TLine this summer by puffing tough and landing the mad inverts in the park.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't succumb to the hype. I've seen some sick shit pulled on skinny skis and Asolo Snowfields. I learned on Karhu Nansen Mountain 210's with the original Voile plate bindings and 1950's style leather boots that I drilled holes in the toe so they would engage the pins of the binding. Asolo Extremes are bomber. Just practice transitioning from a snowplow and dropping into the turn and back....repeat.

There you be

bigdrink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the advice, looking forward to it. weak erik? this from the new smith rock posterboy? say hi to the chicas on cinnamon slab for me this weekend yellaf.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

iain just doesnt know how to handle the snowboard bunnies so in his rage towards his own fears he lashes out towards other in an attempt to increase his ego with false threats of violence.

 

yellaf.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i dont know?

 

chicas in prana tops make my day.

 

i like chicas.

 

i like prana tops.

 

i like rock climbing.

 

weak.

 

wave.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ian,

 

I think it's better to learn on Leathers. Yeah, you will fall on your face...but don't be suprised or get bummed about it, the more you do it the less you will face plant. With leathers you will really learn how to do a tele turn. You won't be able to fake it like you can with plastics, but that is why they are good.

 

Get a soft ski that has a traditional sidecut. That will be best for leathers, big fat turny skiis will be too much. I use old Elan MBX's for those leather days, or when the rocks are out.

 

I didn't have a hard time converting from alpine, other than a few rough days and one broken thumb. Once I got use to the light set up of leathers and pins, I could never go back...it was like skiing in comfy hiking boots rather than foot torture devices. Plus, the groomers take on a whole new light!

 

Spring snow is great to learn on, good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah I figured the spring snow is so boring at times that it is time to try something new. thanks for the advice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent my first couple seasons skiing on leathers...its all about matching your boots to your skis to make sure you have a good time. I'd stay away from anything with too much sidecut or skis that have a waist wider than 70mm, then you may be asking too much of your leather boots.

My first pair of tele boards were BD Synchro X's that had a 55mm waist and a tip that was something like 70mm.

 

Something you might want to think about is your choice of bindings with leathers....3-pin cable will virtually never release even in falls, and you will take plenty of falls learning to tele on floppy gear. An old tried and true binding that you can find used for dirt cheap is the Riva 2...the way it is designed its pretty easy to eject out of it in a fall and without having a beefy plastic boot to protect your ankle from getting sprained you may want a binding that doesn't hold onto your foot too tightly. Just my 2 cents...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also recommend a lesson or two and both of Nils Larsen's instructional videos, "Freedom of the Hills" and "Beyond the Groomed". These tools will help you avoid hard to get rid of bad habits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this is all a bunch of crap. laugh.gif

 

why throw away years of advances in technology and design?

simple is fine, but back to leather and 3 pin? If you're a strong alpiner, and you actually want to learn to tele-rip, you're wasting your time. Of course, if you just want to have fun and goof around, by all means, go ahead...

 

used t3s or t2s with Rivas, G3s, or another simple cable, on whatever old skis you can find.

 

 

Edited by Cletus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got some old TUA Toute Neiges in a 210 that I might be willing to part with. Other skis that'd work well would be Tua Cirques or Tua Montets. If your looking to actually tour on these 3pins are the way to go for covering distance - cables (unless you loosen them substantially) will take a nice bit of energy with every stride.

 

If you really want to learn to tele, leathers are the only way to go - you'll learn an art, as opposed to the paint by number skiing that plastics require. Extreme Pro's are a great way to start.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True, I now ski with old T3s and like the power and tourability as well as their dryness. However, I still have my Snofield II leather boots and love them for blue groomers, corn snow and fast tours where I am not carrying a heavy pack. Iain, if you go plastic, go low cut, the best of all worlds. Keep the extremes tho.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cletus I hear you and I still like to let it rip on my r:ex/freerides but I learned how much fun it is to try something new when I started skiing on plastic mtnring boots and light skis. It felt really cool to be able to cruise around the mountain with these things and feeling the snow under your feet rather than the dead feeling alpine gear brings (which is a good thing in crud). I also do a lot of survival skiing on searches in canyons and stuff where I'm making a lot of kick turns and skiing rolling terrain where AT gear can be a bit of a pain sometimes. Just something new to try. Thanks everyone for the great advice, maybe when I get some cash I'll get some atomic superlights, until then, I can borrow from some friends. thumbs_up.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

actually, I think I was trolling a little. I have much respect for those who kill it on leathers or any old school/old style. But I do think you'll find the transition easier than you think, and my guess is that you'll be begging for something more substantial than the leathers and 3-pins sooner than expected.

 

I still think I would push you towards soft, low, plastic boots, and a very neutral cable binder.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but either way, who cares? You're gonna have a blast!! Tele is a kick in the pants; a whole different rythm.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Iain, tele skiing sucks. Unless you want to learn to develop an alternating rythm between arm flailing and punching the ground for balance, while whining "Wait up, wait up" to your snowboarder buddies who've ony been riding for 4 months, don't waste your time. Tele skiing is a pointless excercise in frustration and pain that turns you into a bitter, cynical snow-snob who never enjoys skiing except when EVERTHING is perfect (which it never is) and when NOONE is looking (which they never are, anyways because they're way ahead of you.)

 

That being said, enjoy. I love it more than anything else in the world. And leather is definitely the way to learn, but not the way to progress past a certain point (unless you are an exceptionally gifted athlete).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×