Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
JGowans

A Good All-Round Rope

Recommended Posts

Is there such a thing? I'd like a rope that I can use for anything...rock, alpine, and glacier. Is there such a thing? I'd like to get a good 60m dry rope but that seems like too much weight for 2 or 3 folks on glacier travel.

 

So, what do you recommend for my first rope, and do you know of any good deals? Bear in mind that most use for now will be sport routes and glacier travel.

 

Thanks in advance for the advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BEST ALL AROUND ROPE IS THE MAMMUT SUPER SAFE.

 

HEAVY AND HUGE DIAMTER! BUT WORTH IT

 

EDELWIESS ROPES ARE GREAT TOO!!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bluewater Energizer would be a great all-around rope, IMO.

The one rope I bought that wasn't a Bluewater sucks. I use it only for sportclimbing. Double 8.8s, 10.5, and 10mm all made in GA by the Newells.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a 10mm dry 60m for all around rock and ice. But there's no way around it, that's overkill for glacier walking, where you want a short skinnny rope. You will end up with a lot of ropes, but start with the fat long one. wazzup.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10mm 60m dry. Too beefy for glaciers but a good start. Carrying heavy things long ways makes you stronger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sphinx said:

Use a 10mm dry 60m for all around rock and ice. But there's no way around it, that's overkill for glacier walking, where you want a short skinnny rope. You will end up with a lot of ropes, but start with the fat long one. wazzup.gif

 

Thanks. Is there any particular that you swear by. Also, is it really a big difference in dry v. non-dry?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got a 9.8mm Maxim 60m dry, bi-color that I've used for everything (sport, trad, ice, mountaineering). If I only could afford one rope, this rope would be the one I'd choose.

Edited by iceguy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

best rope is a booty rope. i have scored 4 over the years but only have 2 now cause i had to share. yellaf.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only used the Mammut Galaxy. I rather like it. 10mm, reasonably durable, etc. I haven't used anything else except for Mammut's Flash which sucks, as it's fatter, heavier, floppy, fuzzy, sheath slips, etc, bad rope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Sterling Marathon ropes. The sheaths are very durable, and it seems that most ropes get retred just cause of sheath damage when the cores are stil perfectly ok.

 

However, they do have a stiff hand, and higher impact forces...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'd recommend PMI or Maxim (the best I've owned) ropes. The one Bluewater I bought sucked. Heavy, sheath wore quickly and had a crappy hand (okay Trask, insert joke here). But it was the right price when I bought it.

 

You will want two ropes, one for for climbing and one for glacier travel. I suggest 10.2MM (or smaller)x 60M, bi-colored for a climbing rope. Dry treatment wears off sooner or later, so if you're not going to be using it on glaciers, is it worth the extra $$? A 30M, 9MM or 9.8MM dry rope will work for glaciers and very moderate alpine rock (think Challenger). A lot lighter and worth having. Get a buddy to split the cost of the glacier rope or buy a remnant rope (usually the ends of a spool sold either by a shop or manufacturer). Check this web site for examples:

 

http://www.gx.starvedrockoutfitters.com/cgi-bin/miva?Merchant2/merchant.mv+Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=G&Category_Code=SR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought a Maxim like Iceguy's. So far I like it, but for just cragging, I think I like a really fat rope. I'd like to just keep it for alpine routes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another option would be to get a pair of Lannex double's from www.acmeclimbing.com for $139 Use the doubles for technical climbing and a single strand for glacier and low - mid fifth climbs. Thats my next rope(s).

 

If I were to pick one single strand it would probably be in the 9.4- 9.8 mm range, dry treated and at least 60m. But, lotsa people have slogged glaciers with a 10.5mm x 50m (myself included) no problemo. Hope that helps.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're really cheap (like, want to buy 1 rope to last for the next 3 years or more), and do mostly cragging, get a fat rope. I'd second Lambone's comments about a Sterling. I have the Marathon 10.5, and it's still in great shape after a couple of solid seasons on it, mostly cragging. Of course it's a bunch heavier than a 10, but so what? It will last way longer than a sporto/alpine rope. This type of rope will also not desintegrate if you do the odd bit of toproping or aid climbing (which are murder on skinny ropes).

 

And yeah, if you're going to be doing glacier climbing, it's way overkill, and in that case you really need a skinny half rope. Although I'm sure any given weekend on Baker/Rainier you could find a few parties dragging 10.5 or 11mm ropes around...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i dont like sterlings

 

i have had two of them both 70m 9.7 marathons

 

less then one year.

 

truthfully though if you climb a fair amount*(i do sometimes!!) a rope is a rope they all wear out.

 

i buy the deals now.

 

though if i see a sterling for $10 less then an edelwiess i go with the edelwiess.

 

only rope i would get over a 9.9 or smaller would be a mammut super safe and that would primarliy be an aid climbing rope.

 

maxim and pmi or crap imho. core shot specials! maybe we were using them wrong, but i dont think so.

 

i like th edelwiess and the mammut cauze of their success with edge testing. which is my biggest rope fear!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO - I would say you could use a single 60m 9.4 for pretty much anything, but why would you want to?

 

Sport climbing and glacier climbing are at the extreme ends of climbing. When I'm climbing sport routes at the crags I fall. Not only fall, but big falls. I wouldn't want to be falling on a rope that I don't know how many times its been cramponed or suffered from the wear and tear of alpine climbing. And if you do get an all in one rope I think you wear it all pretty fast and you'll spend just as much or more money buying a second rope in a year then if you had purchased 2 ropes in the beginning.

 

This might not work for everyone but I think having 2 separate ropes is the way to go. Try a 9.8 60meter something for sport climbing and maybe more technical rock routes. Then either a 30m 8.5 or even a 60m 8.5 for glacier and easy 5th class climbs. With this system you can also, choosing the 60m x 8.5, use it as a tag and rap line.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 50m x 9mm for glacier, 60m x 9.4 for alpine and 60m x 10.5 for cragging, etc. This is a good combo for me, of course it defeats the whole "one rope for all purposes" point of this thread.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like the search for "the best all-around rope" is a lot like the search for "the best all-around pack." Certainly you could use a 60m 11mm rope for glacier travel, just as you could use a 70L pack as a daypack. IMHO, if I had to chose just one rope, it'd probably be my 9.9mm 50m Edelweiss. Though for glacier travel, a 30m 9.0 rope is about half the bulk and weight.

 

And, as far as good deals, Gearexpress.com usually has ropes at really good prices, if you're willing to pick from what they have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alpine_Tom said:

Seems like the search for "the best all-around rope" is a lot like the search for "the best all-around pack." Certainly you could use a 60m 11mm rope for glacier travel, just as you could use a 70L pack as a daypack. IMHO, if I had to chose just one rope, it'd probably be my 9.9mm 50m Edelweiss. Though for glacier travel, a 30m 9.0 rope is about half the bulk and weight.

 

And, as far as good deals, Gearexpress.com usually has ropes at really good prices, if you're willing to pick from what they have.

i got a 60m 9.9 eldelwiess, and it sucks. like a cable. the picks of the sheath are too big. guess thats why it was on sale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×