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adventuregal

How much experience needed for sport leading?

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Just to spell it out for anyone who doesn't see why I posted that link.

 

That link appears to tell the story of someone who got injured very badly sport climbing because he didn't know what he didn't know (and it appears that he still doesn't).

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Dru said:

i have seen "lots" (3 or 4) of people lead climb 9trad) after climbing for about a week or so, maybe seconding and TRing about 20 routes in all... as long as you are a) confident in your own ability, b) able to walk the talk and actually BUILD anchors not just think you can build them, then you are probably ready to try leading

 

I was one of those guys about 18 years ago. Had been climbing for about a month when my partner thought it was time for me to lead something. I had Dru's "part a" down pretty well, being a young buck back then. Wasn't quite there with "part b" yet, though I didn't know that just then.

 

It was a 5.9 at Bridge Buttress in the New River Gorge in WV. It was also my partner's "keen" idea to sell me on the climb as a 5.6, me not yet able to look at it and be able to tell the difference. It's called "sandbagging", and watch out for it, A-gal. As has been said here before, go with someone you trust first.

 

It cost me two - TWO! - 30-footers, back to back, shocked.gif because I had overclimbed my last piece on a layback and futzed around too long on one arm trying to build an anchor with the other one. Not once, but twice! So spend some time with a rack of gear making placements. I walked around campus for two weeks placing gear in any crack I could find between classes. It helped tremendously when I returned and climbed the route cleanly.

 

Luckily I was not hurt in the falls because they were airballs, but the sudden stop DID hurt. Learn how to fall as well.

 

'nuff said.

 

...sobo

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Muffy_The_Wanker_Sprayer said:

 

there are old climbers and there are bold climbers... there are VERY FEW old bold climbers.

 

-someone says that??? who is it jk???

 

If memory serves, I believe it was the venerable Paul Petzoldt, a member of the second (?) ascent party of the Grand Teton and later the founder of NOLS, who coined that little gem.

 

...sobo

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sobo said:

Muffy_The_Wanker_Sprayer said:

 

there are old climbers and there are bold climbers... there are VERY FEW old bold climbers.

 

-someone says that??? who is it jk???

 

If memory serves, I believe it was the venerable Paul Petzoldt, a member of the second (?) ascent party of the Grand Teton and later the founder of NOLS, who coined that little gem.

 

...sobo

 

COOL cool.gif thank you bigdrink.gif

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sobo said:

Dru said:

i have seen "lots" (3 or 4) of people lead climb 9trad) after climbing for about a week or so, maybe seconding and TRing about 20 routes in all... as long as you are a) confident in your own ability, b) able to walk the talk and actually BUILD anchors not just think you can build them, then you are probably ready to try leading

 

I was one of those guys about 18 years ago. Had been climbing for about a month when my partner thought it was time for me to lead something. I had Dru's "part a" down pretty well, being a young buck back then. Wasn't quite there with "part b" yet, though I didn't know that just then.

 

It was a 5.9 at Bridge Buttress in the New River Gorge in WV. It was also my partner's "keen" idea to sell me on the climb as a 5.6, me not yet able to look at it and be able to tell the difference. It's called "sandbagging", and watch out for it, A-gal. As has been said here before, go with someone you trust first.

 

It cost me two - TWO! - 30-footers, back to back, shocked.gif because I had overclimbed my last piece on a layback and futzed around too long on one arm trying to build an anchor with the other one. Not once, but twice! So spend some time with a rack of gear making placements. I walked around campus for two weeks placing gear in any crack I could find between classes. It helped tremendously when I returned and climbed the route cleanly.

 

Luckily I was not hurt in the falls because they were airballs, but the sudden stop DID hurt. Learn how to fall as well.

 

'nuff said.

 

...sobo

 

Ha!! I know the route i bet...is it that Layback thing called, "Layback"?? Man, that thing was/is a slippery mofo...

 

What did you think of angel's arete??? Man, that thing was classic...soloed that as an 18 year-old...stupidest thing i had done yet!

 

GAWD I miss the new!!!

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