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Loco Raindrops

question Synthetic Belay Jacket Parka thingamabobber

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Posted (edited)

So, I am looking for a synthetic belay jacket. It will only get used on climbs so I dont want to go bonkers buying a $600+ parka. 

The price premium isn't justified for me for the amount of use it will see. 

My upper layers consist of SW NTS 250 1/4 zip, Arc Fortrez hoody, Arc Proton Ar(hooded,) Arc Alpha SV if that matters. 

(I like deadbird stuff, it just fits me.)

....when combined this system is very warm to say the least and even in -20s here in Rocksylvania I rarely use this combo unless stagnant. 

I looked at the Arc Dually but kinda hard swallowing the price tag on it.

Im considering the BD Stance...

Any other suggestions out there on a synthetic parka that will do the job and not break the bank? I just dont see the sense in going nuts on this item being the limited use it will see. 

I just want something that works. 

I prefer synthetic on this layer but am open to down.

I may also just rent. 

As always thanks in advance.  

Edited by Loco Raindrops

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On ‎7‎/‎28‎/‎2019 at 9:58 AM, Loco Raindrops said:

My upper layers consist of SW NTS 250 1/4 zip, Arc Fortrez hoody, Arc Proton Ar(hooded,) Arc Alpha SV if that matters. 

(I like deadbird stuff, it just fits me.)

Im considering the BD Stance...

Any other suggestions out there on a synthetic parka that will do the job and not break the bank? I just dont see the sense in going nuts on this item being the limited use it will see. 

I just want something that works. 

I prefer synthetic on this layer but am open to down.

I may also just rent. 

 

So, my take.  For Rainier, you could take exactly what you have now and be fine.  In my opinion, you are likely to be very warm on the approach.  I would add a short sleeve, lightweight tee shirt as that wool base layer will get hot. The Fortrez and Proton more or less serve the same function, so you could ditch one, or bring them both and just use the Proton as your belay parka.

If you want a dedicated belay parka (Dane Burns coined the term 'climbing sweater' to define garments like the Proton), a 100 gram Primaloft Gold or similar weight proprietary fill, hooded parka is what you want.  The BD Stance is a good choice, Patagonia Micropuff is another good choice.   Don't forget to look at what Marmot, LL Bean, NW Alpine, First Ascent and other, lesser known brands have to offer.

Key features you should be looking for:

- Cut - large enough to fit over all layers without being too bulky

- Hood - helmet compatible

- Fill - 100 gram Primaloft Gold is the  gold standard.  Other brand may use their one proprietary fill.  I would not recommend down in the PNW.

Bear in mind the old approach to layering is wrong.  There are only two situations you need to dress for: heat generating movement and heat loosing statis.  On summit day dress so that you will be just warm enough while moving.  You should be cold while you are waiting around and zero dark thirty for your rope mates get their act together.  Put your belay parka on over everything while you are waiting, having a lunch break, or when it is really cold and windy towards the summit.

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Posted (edited)

The Proton AR is much warmer than the Fortrez. The Fortrez is basically a hardface fleece with a built in buff. 

I just get worried about how stringent the guides will be during gear check. Ive heard some horror stories lol. 

I cant see my combining the Fortrez and Proton on a climb unless I want to drop 40lbs in water weight on the uphill slog via sweat and sweating is the last thing ya want in any cold environment as I am sure doesnt need to be said. 

I figured that the Fortrez with the 250wt baselayer would be more than adequate in most scenarios at the beginning of the climb and can adjust as needed. 

RMI has a "required" list of items and I have heard of folks being told if you dont have a specific item some guides will say you either buy it, rent it, or you dont go.

I have technical ss shirts, etc. My wife tells me all the time that my man cave looks like a REI sales floor. 

Ive accumulated a lot of gear over the years to say the least lol.

In all honesty I just want this to go smoothly and not catch static from a guide with my gear choices. 

 

Edited by Loco Raindrops

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DPS, on the "required list" of items for the Muir seminar thru RMI they actually require a lightweight insulation layer and then a midweight. 

Thats where the Fortrez and Proton come in on my end. They are kinda forcing me to tote both up the ridge. 

Scroll down on the link and you will see what I mean. 

https://www.rmiguides.com/mt-rainier/camp-muir-seminar/equipment

I have an ascender. Can someone point me out to the pros of bringing one on a climb like this? Just trying to justify having it hanging from my harness. 

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Ascenders can be used instead of Prusik loops for ascending out of a crevasse and in z pull systems and on fixed ropes. Easier to use than Prusiks, but much heavier and not as versatile.  (Prusik loops can be used in anchors, as V-threads, replacement boot laces...)

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21 hours ago, Loco Raindrops said:

My wife tells me all the time that my man cave looks like a REI sales floor. 

Own a lot of dresses and clogs do you?

  • LMAO 1

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, DPS said:

Own a lot of dresses and clogs do you?

Lmao. 

Only a few now. I kept the shortest ones.

...bet you wont be laughing when you see me coming thru the snowfield looking like the 2nd coming of Grandma Gatewood. ;)

Edited by Loco Raindrops

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, DPS said:

Ascenders can be used instead of Prusik loops for ascending out of a crevasse and in z pull systems and on fixed ropes. Easier to use than Prusiks, but much heavier and not as versatile.  (Prusik loops can be used in anchors, as V-threads, replacement boot laces...)

I figured as much. I didnt think there were many fixed lines on the DC. So, justified to bring in your opinion or more of a burden due to the weight?

I figured I can also use a prusik to hang my bear bag somewhere on route not so much for bears but for penguins and rogue Sleestaks. 

SmartSelect_20190731-130642_Google.jpg

Edited by Loco Raindrops

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We dont have much here outside of REI for outdoor gear. 

I cant even look at a pair of mountaineering boots unless I make a 4hr drive. 

Sucks. 

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Depending upon the route conditions there can be a fixed line from the Ingraham Glacier to the spine of the Disappointment Cleaver as well as with ladders that have been placed across crevasses.  Not worth bringing in my opinion, however, you do need some way of ascending a rope, be that an ascender, Prusik slings, WC Ropeman, Petzl Tiblocs (keep meaning to buy a pair), Petzl Micro Traxion, etc.

I was pretty excited when an REI went up in my town.  The mountain shop we had was awesome,  but like so many independent retailers went out of business.  My crack about REI is because the REI in my town sells more women's clothes and shoes than anything else.  Their climbing section is about 8' x 8' and they are 'not allowed' to sell any ice climbing gear, like screws and ice tools.  They don't sell pitons or even proper mountaineering boots, other than lightweight boots like Scarpa Charmoz, LS Trango….

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We have the same thing here with REI. A lot is more geared towards the urban commuter. 

I rarely go there unless I need someting in a pinch. 

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Try finding an OR Chaos or Perch belay parka if you really feel like you need the extra layer. They're usually cheap on the resale market, or on sale, and have all of the good features you want (two way zippers, internal waterbottle/glove pockets, helmet compatible hood).

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Ive seen good feedback on the Perch and it has been one of 3 that I am considering. 

Not familiar with the Chaos so thanks for the mention. Will definitely check it out.

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Good call on OR, I really like their garments.  I have a wind shirt I really like and a down parka that have been really great pieces.

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Posted (edited)

I just realized Wild Things doesnt make the stuff they once did. I had a make your own design awhile back from them.

Sheesh I am way out of touch. 

Edited by Loco Raindrops

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