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diggler

Mt. Daniel approach conditions, central-N WA Cascades snow level

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Greetings, 

I'll be making a trip to WA from CO in a little over a week's time- STOKED!!!

Among other things I want to do, climbing a mountain is HIGH on the list! As I'm recovering from a broken heel (one side) & a broken ankle (the other; surgery), I'm looking for something manageable given my limitations. A glacier climb with a bit of scrambling, with kick-ass views, sounds GREAT for me right now.

While I'm certainly not averse to some snow, I'm also well aware how much it can slow you down on the way up. Anybody aware of the current snowline/approach conditions? While I could bring snowshoes/skis, if the snow were consolidated enough, I would prefer just boot-packing it (without post-holing the whole way). For those familiar with the approach, what would a reasonable timeline be to approach (assuming a campsite along the way), summit, & get back??? I would say that I am hiking at 75% - 80% of an average pace currently.

Other 1-2 day objectives fairly close to Seattle with hiking/potential snow-glacier travel/up to 4th (maybe a little easy 5th) also greatly appreciated- THANKS!!!!!

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The big, isolated west-side peaks are reasonably close to Seattle, and none has a ridiculous approach.  Sloan and Whitehorse both have some amount of glacier travel, and Darrington is... a unique cultural experience.

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