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question Dry treated ropes?

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Multipitch near the road where you plan to take falls or multipitch in the alpine that you aren't planning to take many falls on?

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For cragging/trad rock I buy whatever ~10 mm x 60 meter is on sale.   Any diameter around 10mm is light enough for cragging and durable enough. I lucked out on my last purchase, a Beal 9.8mm x 60m.  Nice supple rope, nice rope bag with tarp, marked in the middle.  I think I paid around $100 or less for it.

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As I understand it, on dry treated rope, the treatment on the surface of the rope wears off with usage on rock,  the dry rock rubs off the treatment. The dry treatment can be very important for alpine climbing , especially ice climbing. Air below freezing temp but the rope gets wet with a drip or water running inside or over ice etc. The rope can turn into a ice encrusted thread.

   Not much reason to have a dry treated rope for dry rock usage, ie most of the treatment rubbed off when you need it. Buy and save your dry treated ropes for those conditions when you may really need it.

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On ‎3‎/‎24‎/‎2019 at 1:06 PM, DanO said:

As I understand it, on dry treated rope, the treatment on the surface of the rope wears off with usage on rock,  the dry rock rubs off the treatment. The dry treatment can be very important for alpine climbing , especially ice climbing. Air below freezing temp but the rope gets wet with a drip or water running inside or over ice etc. The rope can turn into a ice encrusted thread.

   Not much reason to have a dry treated rope for dry rock usage, ie most of the treatment rubbed off when you need it. Buy and save your dry treated ropes for those conditions when you may really need it.

I completely agree.  Dry treated ropes are not necessary and only increase the expense for rock climbing.  Who rock climbs in the rain?  I NEVER buy dry treated ropes for cragging/rock climbing and am always able to find really nice, 60 meter cords for under $100.  Alpine and ice climbing is a different story.  I use doubles and spend the extra $ for dry treatment. Climbing with frozen ropes is no fun.

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Counterpoint: I find that dry treated ropes are more supple and easier to handle than non-dry ropes. They run smoother over edges and rough rock and leave less of themselves behind on these features. The dry treatment permeates the entire sheath, not just its exposed exterior, so they will retain water repellant qualities even after they have been used a lot and become worn. If you climb in the mountains, your rope is going to get wet sooner or later, and if it's not dry treated it's going to get a lot heavier a lot faster and stay wet longer. Have you ever rappelled down a wet rope? Imagine if you could cut the amount of water in it by 75% or more in that scenario. Yes, dry treatment costs more, but it has many benefits too. Moreover, like "Gortex" jackets, not all dry treatments are equal. Some lose their effectiveness relatively quickly. Others seemingly last forever.  Dry ropes have their uses. Non-dry ropes have a narrower set of uses. The best rope is the one you have with you when you need one! Have fun!

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13 hours ago, Rad said:

If you climb in the mountains, your rope is going to get wet sooner or later,

That was my point.  When I am climbing in the mountains, I take dry treated ropes, no question.  For rock climbing in sunny weather at Index, Leavenworth, or Squamish, Smith Rock, etc., I don't find the dry treatment to be worth the extra cost when I can get a great 60 meter, 9.8mm rope for < $100. 

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