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max

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Posts posted by max


  1. 7 hours ago, JasonG said:

    Good point!  Also, the Downy Creek trail has been burned over and is still smoking.  Will be spicy/filthy for some time, likely years.  Those burns can be spooky, esp. in wind.

    Not to mention... "closed". :) I'd bet it stays officially closed through the winter.

    Agencies are ratcheting up their closures "for public safety". 

     

    But the ninja does not care. the ninja is only concerned with the flow. 


  2. Just did a trip with similar attributes: relatively high ridge running (wind); camping at high lakes; north cascades. Didn't really mind the bugs most of the time, but glad I had a meshed tent to chill in the evening. Could you get by without? sure. Is it worth the weight drop? I doubt it.

    You might consider how much of the night you anticipate being "out" of your sleeping bag... i was pretty warm at night even at 6800.

     

     


  3. 1 minute ago, chandlerg said:

     My fingers are crossed for that.

    Indeed. It will be a sad situation if we're indoors ALL summer.

    My suspicion is that as this rolls on longer and longer, the guidelines for being outside/getting some exercise will be more and more clear. non-improved sites are not included in the National Forest  closures....


  4. 28 minutes ago, genepires said:

    Very envious of skiers on the way back to the airstrip, though.

    THAT is real pain...

    When talking about extended time at sub zero F, we shouldn't even be talking about "tight" boots. It should be "Are those boots even snug."


  5. 3 hours ago, genepires said:

    " putting your autoblock on your leg loop is good for a third hand but is not a redundant back up for your rappel device/belay loop/main rappel carabiner "

    the loop for autoblock does not need to be anywhere as strong as a belay loop.  We are talking about the small prussik that backs up the brake hand I assume.   Basically it needs to be as strong as your hand grip is.  the autoblock replaces the hand as a way to apply braking force to the rappel device.

    I wish my grip strength was in excess of 15Kn pulling force.

    So Gene: what's the "best" way to back up a rappel? prussik above the belay device? autolocking device above the belay device? Rappel deaths seem to have good "gear" solutions if you know the right gear and configuration.

     

    Dave

     


  6. I'm not sure which crossing you're talking about... at the end of the (summer) driveable road (to get to second half of road/trail), or at the end of the trail/just before entering the cirque (to get to Price Lake/Nooksack Ridge)?

    At the end of the road, last winter there was a log jam immediately down the trail from the parking lot. Gets you onto a big sand bar, then (sometimes requires) another log jam to cross a braid that shows up in high water. Overall, chill.

    Last time I was up the trial, I saw some flagging right at the wilderness boundary sign (recently smashed by a snag and (I think) put back up) that (I think) marked a route to a snag across the Nooksack. But I can't remember that part. Know I saw some flagging. But that's only if you're trying to cross the Nooksack to get to Price Lake et al.


  7. Not sure what your looking for (distance/days) or where your looking (basically, how far you're willing to drive) but here are some routes I have had good luck with:

     

    1. Wells Cr Rd out of Glacier is currently gated at mile one and continues passably another... 14 (?) miles to the Cougar divide trail head. Really neat river scene at mile 4-ish, great views of Baker soon after. Zero traffic guaranteed.

     

    2. I suggest it mostly because of its location: There's a network of USFS roads NW of Darrington I've ridden that get you into some cool forested/(and deforested) areas. Not much majestic vistas, but neat places none the less. I made a loop from Darrington clockwise along FR18 to FR 17 to the Concrete- Sauk River Rd and back to Darrington via Hwy530.

     

    3. Smith Brook off of Steven's pass will have traffic the first 3-4 miles, but once it drops over in to Lake Wenatchee, you're golden. I'd suggest starting at Hwy2/Smith Brook, riding over to a campground in the Little Wenatchee River, then back the next day. It will be hot. Welcome to the suck.

     

    4. Speaking of lake wenatchee, Check out the Chumstick/Maverick Saddle/Entiat ridge/Eagle creek loop. Starts near Freund Canyon (Bikes and Brews place), Heads north towards Plain, veers NE to Maveric Saddle on Entiat Ridge, south along the ridge, and back west/south to the car via Eagle creek. GREAT views of the area, long climb/descent, overall very high quality road surface, and I bet you see 10 cars off the paved portion (approx 10 miles of pavement, 35 miles dirt.

     

    5. Ok, even one more east. The Big Hill cabin can be accessed via Entiar River Rd/Shady Pass rd, or from Lake Chelan/25 Mile Creek. Both routes involve significant grinding (though really huge terrain), but Big Hill is a pretty amazing location. Again, embrace the heat as part of the environment.

     

    Honestly, I'd suggest opening your criteria to "open rds" too. In my experience, if the road is at all remote, the traffic is minimal. Cascade River Rd is the busiest rd around, and I've ridden it (lame) and it was pretty quiet overall.

     

    I'd suggest an overnighter if this is your first bike camping trip. Its just a great way to shake down what you need and don't really need. The less I carry, the more I enjoy the ride!

     

    If you don't like smoke, consider checking the the O-W national forest website for fire info.

     

    Please report back on what you end up doing.

     

     


  8. Safe? Sure. 99% of the "falls" on a glacier just aren't falls, they're slips, and the forces involved are 1/20 those involved in even top rope climbing. Your rope won't snap.

     

    A good rope for a glacier? Doubt it. Admittedly, I've become more of a gear snob, but even a moderate size crag rope is too fat, too fuzz, too long, and primarily too heavy for a glacier rope. Safe, but not preferred. I have an old half rope (8.something by 100') that's been my glacier rope for a while now.

     

    But, as they say in tonasket, "run what ya brung."

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