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bedellympian

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Everything posted by bedellympian

  1. [TR] Glacier NP - multiple 11/22/2020

    @olyclimber and @JasonG thanks for the help! Pictures are now posted.
  2. [TR] Glacier NP - multiple 11/22/2020

    Views from up on Mt Brown... Views from Avalanche Lake basin... Sprague creek pillars... Lake Macdonald...
  3. dry tooling PNW Joins The 21st Century

    By PNW I think you mean the Seattle/WesternWA area... Various spots in Oregon and Eastern WA have had this going on for a while
  4. Funny thing I've noticed is that Shuksan's image gets (mis)used quite a lot. My mom visited Glacier NP a couple years a go and got me a tshirt at the gift store... it's definitely a picture of Shuksan on it and says "Glacier National Park" right above it.
  5. ROCKTOBER!

    Today (Sat 10/3) Smith was the busiest I've seen it since last fall. Seems like the park has thrown out all COVID precautions, even the grass overflow lot was open and mostly full. Still weirdly warm and smokey though.
  6. I recently bought this. It was on sale on Backcountry.com and I needed a new belay jacket. I had heard some good things about Norrona in general being a high quality brand from the Euros I climbed with in Canada last winter. It's one we don't see much of here so its kind of an unknown and I figured I'd give a run down as it is a very nice piece, well suited to Cascades winter climbing and a resonable price too. Pros: light weight, warm (relative to other 100g primaloft jackets I've tried this feels very warm), lower cost than some other high quality options like Patagonia or Arcteryx ($260), has several large pockets (2x chest outside of insulation, 2x hands inside insulation, 1x mesh inside jacket), double zipper, and MY FAVORITE... the hood is awesome (best single draw cinch i've seen, has a brim to shelter from spindrift, zips up to the nose, really seals in the warmth). Cons: I would prefer a second mesh pocket inside the jacket, the giant uninsulated chest pockets don't seem very useful to me at this point. Overall: I think this is a really well designed and quality belay parka.
  7. question Next Generation Hard Shells

    Bump... anybody got experience with newer extra-breathable/stretchy hard shells?
  8. DIY Altitude Training , does it work??

    If you read the Uphill Athlete literature they would advise you to save the money (and energy wasted sleeping like shit in your own bed) and just do way more easy aerobic volume. I find this helpful personally and have had a strong correlation between having lots of endurance and well rested/hydrated and doing great at altitude up to 14k'.
  9. Anyone Coached by Uphill Athlete or Other?

    If you're really looking for coaching and interested mostly in aerobic development I recommend Trails and Tarmac https://trailsandtarmac.com/coaching/ as an alternative that is a bit cheaper. They mostly train ultra runners but I have a couple mountain guide friends who have worked with them and seen significant results. One of their owners Ryan Ghelfi is a former mountain guide and still does a lot of skimo stuff.
  10. Anyone Coached by Uphill Athlete or Other?

    You could purchase an uphill athlete training plan. Paying a monthly fee is for people who really need hand holding... either because they aren't willing to put in the effort to read and learn themselves, they are lazy and rich, or they are really pushing their limits and need someone with lots of experience to hold them on that edge without going over. If you've read TFTNA and played around with training already you're most likely going to be able to coach yourself and see significant gains.
  11. Assuming it was from the plane that seems highly unlikely. Is it possible the chemicals in drugs could break down and yield a negative test after a winter and good portion of summer out there? Either that or it's a thinly veiled attempt to get those involved to incriminate themselves? What else could it be? Illegal shipment of cane sugar?
  12. idea Winter/Spring climbing glove discussion

    I have a lower quality Showa knock-off. They're durable but moisture builds up inside and kills the warmth too quickly for long days. I save them for wet leads. I've typically climbed alpine routes in the OR Arete which is good but less durable than I'd really like. I bought a variety of gloves off steepandcheap (you get what you pay for) the other year to try. Two were OR and they both wet out and then fail to dry... pretty terrible. One was BD, not super durable but stayed dry longer and dried out sooner. I would really like to support OR over BD but BD does seem to be doing a better job on the gloves right now. Cowolter I'll be trying those soloists and looking into the new Showas.
  13. I have two skimo harnesses I am getting rid of. Neither saw much use and are in good condition but both are older generation a few years old so assess and use at your own risk. I'm thinking $20 plus shipping unless you pickup (in Bend), but I'm open to offers. Edelrid Loopo Light BD Couloir
  14. Bozeman, MT or Victor/Driggs, ID

    If you're going to be mainly up in the summer I'd go with Driggs. If you want to mainly ice climb I'd go with Bozeman. There is going to be more of scene in Bozeman for sure with the bigger population and university. Driggs has a great community but it is small.
  15. Three Sisters Wilderness access

    Fire might have it closed? Call them up.
  16. Amazing effort; unfortunate ending. You'll be back soon for sure, just do the sh*t out of your PT.
  17. Since we're mostly stuck at home and lots of us have installed climbing walls or training apparatus of some sort I thought it would be fun to share what we have going on... maybe give each other some ideas for what we can do to stay fit during this time. Here's what I'm currently using: My wife and I got a squat rack a few years ago, which may not be reasonable purchase for some right now, but how we improvised to hang various rings and straps off it may be helpful. I also duct-taped some foam around the pull-up bar so I had a slide-able pad to hook ice tools on and there is a carabiner through the gymnast rings' webbing so you can clip the head of an ice tool to that for incline pull-ups and such. We use an old coffee table that is quite sturdy as a step-up box. Obviously the hangboard is key, with motivational picture cut out of old climbing rags and a hardware store screw-in hook in the top of the door frame to allow weight reduction on things like one arm hangs. Since my hangboard is very simple, but I also wanted to train pinches, I used some scrap wood and attached an old hook to it so I could add weight. Finally, I built a plice board ala Will Gadd https://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en_US/experience-story?cid=will-gadd-how-to-build-plice which also has wood slats that are smooth enough to crimp on without getting splinters and attached it to a (bigger and stronger than it looks) tree in the backyard with just a slight overhang. Cost about $75 for materials. Attachment to the tree is the crux, I went with 6" lag screws through pressure treated 2x6 and built off of that. Curious to see what others have done. Looking forward to getting more ideas!
  18. Nice! Glad you had fun. You'll have to return a little earlier in the summer for some good skiing.
  19. Trip: 3 Sisters Wilderness - 4 Sisters Traverse RT from Tumalo Falls w/ bike approach Trip Date: 06/26/2020 Trip Report: Normally I wouldn't bother to share a linkup like this, but I think this loop is very aesthetic (both in the areas you move through, and the logical line it draws on a map) and thought others out there might find use in the description... Ever since my first summer in Oregon when I went up several volcanoes I swore that I would never deal with the choss again unless it was coated in snow or ice (this trip fully confirmed that and now that I've done it I have no desire to repeat it, but some of you might be crazy/stupid enough to follow my footsteps). Because of this I had absolutely zero interest in the Sisters Traverse as a summer outing (skiing it in spring I was fine with and found enjoyable). Then, this past winter my friend Miles suggested I could do it as a human powered outing from my house in Bend. I believe he was envisioning something efficient like biking to Green Lakes or Pole Creek trailheads to shorten the distance on foot. However, I immediately thought of biking to Tumalo Falls and doing the traverse as a loop from there. This was for several reasons... 1. the road to Tumalo Falls draws a direct line toward the mountains from town (instead of going way out and around to other trailheads) 2. this road is less busy and more enjoyable to bike 3. the areas you would get to pass through on the approach/depproach are some of my favorite in the area (Farewell Bend trail, Tam Rim, Broken Top trail, Happy Valley and North Fork trail) which favorably skews the scenic hiking to scree slogging ratio 4. the bike and loop made for a logical line when drawn on a map and made it easy to do as a self-supported outing with no bike shuttling. While I thought it was a cool idea, I had other plans this summer. Unfortunately the solstice came and went without a favorable weather window in the less-chossy ranges that I prefer. So, with no other big objectives on the horizon and clear skies locally I ended a 3 day streak of sitting on the couch watching weather models and Netflix to take advantage of the long daylight hours. The nice thing about short trips from your home is the packing is minimal. I woke up, ate a big breakfast, packed and was out the door. Itinerary: bike to Tumalo Falls, hike Farewell Bend trail to FS road 370 N, W on Tam Rim Horse Trail to Tam Rim Trail and the far W end of Tam Rim, drop down cross-country and traverse high eventually picking up the Green Lakes Trail N, take a L on Camp Lake Trail and follow the climbers trail up to the Hayden Glacier and the saddle between North and Middle Sisters (I shiver bivied part way up the ridge above the saddle for a few hours), climb/descend North via the standard S Ridge to Bowling Alley, climb Middle via the N Ridge and descend the S Ridge to Chambers lakes, climb South via the NW Ridge (less steep than the N Ridge but lots of loose scree), and descend the standard climbers trail on the S side to just below the glacier, cut down to Green Lakes (careful not to get cliffed out here) and follow the trail around the S side of the main lake to the climbers trail for Broken Top, climb BT by the standard NW Ridge, scree ski down the W face and traverse L on flatter ground to pop over the SW ridge and connect to the Broken Top Trail, follow this E (lots of snow fields) over the ridge just S of Ball Butte (I cut cross country quite a bit here as everything was under snow), eventually connect with FS road 370 (S of where you had it the first time) headed N and then connect to the Metolius-Windigo Trail, this takes you to Happy Valley where it is only 4 miles of easy and slightly downhill trail to the bike at Tumalo Falls, from here I had a mere 14.5 mile net downhill ride back to my house, arriving home just before I needed to break out the headlamp. I could tell you all the little stories but they are a little hazy and seem rather irrelevant now. I'd love to see someone else do this loop fast. I bet there is someone out there who could destroy it, as supposed to be destroyed like I was. There is a fair amount of off-trail travel and the early summer timing after a wet spring meant there was still lots of snow and some fairly large river crossings, however I would rather have that than endless scree. Gear Notes: road bike, small pack, sun protection, blister kit, trail running shoes with gaiters, spare socks to switch out when your shoes get soaked, light pons/axe, emergency reflective bivy bag and micropuff for the shivering, lots of water to be found early season, GPS w/ topo map were helpful in optimizing the cross-country travel Approach Notes: ride yo bi-cycle!
  20. [TR] Mt Triumph - NE Ridge 07/17/2020

    What is the shortest rope you think you could rap with?
  21. Help! August skiing in Oregon

    But why? There is this thing called rock climbing. It's super fun. There are also things like kayaking, mountain biking, trail running... All of which are great right now and would involve carrying way less stuff, way less far.
  22. Pictures: Sunrise near top of Teewinot Lucas on Teewinot Raps on 11,8XX Lucas descending from East Prong on very firm snow. North side of the Grand from Owen Lucas scoping the Grand Start of N Ridge of the Grandstand, separate team ahead of us... Icy chimney pitch on the N Ridge, dude below is pulling an overhanging chockstone with minimal ice-free hand holds (not your typical 5.8) Looks like easy traversing to OS but an ice gully separates us from that route and we end up going straight up after some faffing. Peaks on L are the Cathedral Group (Teewinot, Owen, Grand) Rock sporings buttress... very cool featured granite, long approach, tons of routes secret Teton Canyon Zone Dog Wall (4p, 5.12+ or 3p 5.11) goes up the edge of the black just above Matt's head and traverses L on a ledge a little before following bolts straight up and finishing on the giant roof just L of the sun. Morning clouds at CMC camp Standing water post-storm in the tent Of course the day just cleared perfectly after I'd retreated and shwacked my way to the trail... at least the sun was out for some swimming. TR soloing the shiite out of Blacktail Butte
  23. Trip: Tetons - Cathedral Traverse + some other stuff Trip Date: 07/18/2020 Trip Report: I spent the past week in the Tetons. On Saturday my friend Lucas and I attempted the Grand Traverse in snowy early season conditions. We did fairly well, minus a route finding snaffu on Owen, but were slowed down a lot by snow/ice and route finding difficulties on the North Ridge of the Grand. We had bivy gear but opted to bail from the Lower Saddle. A couple thoughts for would-be suitors... If you want Sierra-esque conditions this is a mid-August to early-September objective. Rolo's beta page on the Pataclimb site is good but not super detailed and would be worth looking up some more pictures if you are trying to onsight like we were (I'd been up the Grand before but never on the North and Lucas had skied Garnet Canyon once). Italian Cracks and N Ridge in general is not obvious splitter climbing, be prepared. You need to be super stoked if you want to walk right past an easy trail down and continue up Middle and the rest of the traverse, or don't be cause you've already done the best parts (so I was told, and tell myself to soothe my battered ego ). The next few days were spent climbing at various crags (all have directions on MP, but identifying routes isn't always easy)... Rock springs buttress is AMAZING and also an amazingly sustained steep long hike for a crag. I took 2 hrs and was worked. I think camping up there would be sweet and the rock is awesome but S/SW facing so its really a morning-only venue. You can also take the tram or gondola from Teton Village but that costs a lot of money. Teton Canyon's Shady Wall is a short approach and shady all day (big surprise). It's also HARD (sandbagged 10+ warmup, 1-2x hard 5.11, several 12s/13s) and on weird rock (featured granite with flowstone (like limestone) over the face in places). There are other cool crags in Teton Canyon, we did a cool multipitch limestone sport route in a wild location one day but its hard to describe the location and kind of a locals' secret, maybe ask around? Blacktail butte in the NP is also nice limestone sport cragging on vertical edges. People talk sh!t about it but given that I don't get to climb limestone often I thought it was nice and had some good routes. I also went to solo the CMC route on Moran with a leisurely overnight at the CMC camp. I bushwhacked instead of canoe'd, which was a nice mini-cascades flavor, and ended up going in one way and out the other to see both options for going around Leigh Lake. The guidebooks all say to go out the Valley trail and on the East side of Leigh Lake and then bushwhack around the N side of the lake to the gully/creek leading to the the CMC camp, but on a map it looks much better to take the Paintbrush trail around the West side of the lake and then bushwhack in from there. Turns out the guide books were correct (who'da thunk?) and going the E side of Leigh is much more efficient although longer mileage (it's still a pretty decent shwack with neck high ferns, steep side hilling, and downed trees). Anyway, all the jungle blundering was for naught as I got rained on all night at CMC camp and was socked in by cloud all morning. I hiked out only to have things turn perfectly bluebird for the entire afternoon... c'est la vie. Will post some pics later this week. Gear Notes: Approach shoes and an extra pair of socks for when they wet out with the snow travel and post-thunderstorm shwackage. Approach Notes: What the guide books say...
  24. [TR] Liberty Cap - Ptarmigan Ridge C2C 07/11/2020

    We'll make it happen next time!
  25. Trip: Liberty Cap - Ptarmigan Ridge C2C Trip Date: 07/11/2020 Trip Report: Kyle Tarry @ktarry and I climbed Ptarmigan Ridge round trip from Whitewater Campground July 11/12. We originally planned to climb it 12/13 with a bivy at the standard location, but increasing winds and cloud forecast for Saturday night convinced us to just do it in a push starting the evening of the 11th. I think we benefitted in our late season climb from the conditions resulting from this more cloudy and cold summer. We drove up after Kyle got off work and left the car at 8:30pm, did the St. Elmos-Winthrop-Curtis-Carbon approach in the dark and arrived at the start of the route at dawn (water drip on the Curtis and brew stop near the normal bivy spot). The route was in thin conditions compared to other pictures I've seen but the glacier crossings were pretty easy and direct. We climbed a small (20m) ice/mixed step that was pretty gross to cross the schrund, a little L of the typical start, which saved some elevation loss. Firm and sun-cupped/rock-smashed snow made for relatively easy movement above this. There was some low angle ice that took good screws starting the ramp towards the rock step variation, but even this did not require much sustained front-pointing. The rock step seemed longer/steeper due to the low snow there (again compared to other pictures I've seen, and based on the fact that I was past the crux when the fixed pin appeared). We topped Liberty Cap and descended the Emmons (good condition for this time of year, I hear). Visibility dropped significantly as we reached Camp Schurman and it even snowed a bit as we descended the Interglacier. We were back at the car by 7:10pm on Saturday and slept about as well as you would think. Pros of the single push strategy: cool/dark glacier approaches, day packs don't weigh much, we nailed the weather window Cons: we were pretty tired (cons win) Gear Notes: one picket (not used), 3 screws (used a few places), 4 nuts (not used), 1 knife blade (used on rock step), 30 m half rope Approach Notes: standard White River approach to N Side routes
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