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bedellympian

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Everything posted by bedellympian

  1. Trip: North Sister - Complete East Buttress Trip Date: 12/23/2020 Trip Report: The East Buttress of North Sister is listed in the Oregon High guide book but it doesn’t receive much praise there. However, a close reading would interest any winter climber. The Complete East Buttress (“Direct” would be inaccurate) is an obvious extension of this route and several local climbers (myself included) have made the mistake of thinking this awaits a first ascent. However, it has been done, and soloed, by @now_climbing and maybe others too. When Chris first told me he had done it I was a little disappointed as the mystery was diminished, but when he told me it was his favorite alpine climb in Oregon that piqued my interest and I got quite excited to try it in early season conditions.Last winter around this time @kyleptarry and I came darn close despite no ice on the upper buttress and plenty of post holing in wind packed powder.On 12/23 this winter @lim.landon and I decided to give it another go. We hoped the recent rain up to high elevation had created ice earlier than last year but we were betting against ourselves. Despite our pessimism we got lucky and enjoyed near perfect conditions on our way to the summit.Though a little contrived, this route is really good and deserves more attention: long, varied, good rock (for volcanoes), and pitch after pitch of memorable moderate mixed climbing. I've listed a pitch-by-pitch breakdown below, though it would probably be more fun if you go explore for yourself! 😉Hopefully someone else can repeat it while its in good nick! Here are some pictures... Pictures SPOILER ALERT - PITCH BREAKDOWN P1- climb the short vertical ice pillar in the middle of the lower buttress follow easier ice up the gully to a tree and short ice step (WI3+/4-) P2 (simul)- short ice step and snow up to base of cliff, go over ridge crest to R traverse snow and climb up first snow/neve/ice gully to broad snow field on ridge crest simul/solo snow field, stay on crest over a couple high points until you are cliffed out P3- down climb steep snow/neve to the R/N side and traverse at highest opportunity to regain ridge crest P4- black gendarme, climb up and right, down the back side, weave through some orange rock features (downclimb some steep snow) and terrain/body belay (M3) climb up to the next high point on the ridge (easy snow) and rappel off the fixed tat (25m free hanging rappel), this is the end of the lower buttress walk up the snow ridge and right to the obvious double gully which starts the upper buttress P5- if ice is in climb the L of the two gullies (WI2/3), if its dry climb the R gully (runout M4 on nubbins) and traverse back L on easier ground P6- v-slot, continue up this cool feature above the L gully from the last pitch, you can link with the last pitch if you came up the L gully (M3) simul up steep snow above these pitches and either skirt the next cliff band on the R up more snow/neve, or go to the chimney on the L P7 (optional chimney)- climb the chimney past a chock stone and onto low angle slab, some more scrambly bits and then snow above this P8- the snow narrows and steepens with a big rock face feature on the L ending in an exposed and runout slab section (M3 R), climb snow above this and body/terrain belay P9 head up and L (don' get sucked R or you'll be stuck beneath steeper rock), until just below the top of the ridge, then a slight R and some short moves to the ridgecrest (M4) P10 (3 options)- move the belay down the ridge crest to the base of Glissan Pinnacle (the slightly lower of the 2 summits that forms the headwall at the top of Early Morning Couloir) and... option 1- traverse steep exposed snow L over the Thayer Headwall to get around Glissan to the true summit (Prouty Pinnacle) option 2- climb the headwall of Glissan directly (actually quite good, what I would recommend, but more time consuming) (M4, 60m rope stretcher) option 3- traverse steep snow R over the top of EMC, from here you can descend or wrap all the way around Glissan to the summit (definitely the longest distance, and the least cool) P11- summit pinnacle (Prouty Pinnacle) walk across the snowy saddle and climb the NE aspect of the summit (either sketchy rock slabs to snow on the L or stacked jenga pile on the R (M3+ R), OR if both those are looking terrible you could go all the way around the summit to the W side and climb the Bowling Alley gully (AI2/3)) Descent options: down climb Bowling Alley to the W and descend the standard S Ridge, OR rappel the last pitch to the saddle and traverse around Glissan on the N side (steep exposed snow, option 3 from P10), and down climb Early Morning Couloir (I prefer this second option as it gets you back to the base more directly). Expect either descent to be exposed and unprotectable, with lots of high dagger down climbing for over 2k'. Gear Notes: 60m half rope (a 70 would make things a little more comfy), 2 knife blades, nuts from tips to 0.5, single set of cams from 0.4 to 3, screws (2x stubby, 2x 13cm, leave the vthread at home this time of year) Approach Notes: Pole Creek is accessible with high clearance 4WD. Skin/slog is a straight shot on snow (less than 2 hrs car to base)
  2. for sale Arc'teryx Acrux AR Boot size 10

    Bump, for price drop. Can also pickup in Central Oregon.
  3. $550 shipped, obo. Used for two pitches of dry tooling, basically new. Bought them online last May and found they didn't fit my feet well. Message me if you want additional pictures or have questions.
  4. Trip: Mt. Hood - Somewhere on the left side of the North Face Trip Date: 11/08/2020 Trip Report: Sunday was the best looking day so we went; the weather was a fair bit worse than predicted. Gate is now closed but trail is in good shape and a good booter exists to tree line. Lower Elliot is pretty nasty with wind drifts over boulders. Cloud layer between 8,500 and 10,000+ made navigation difficult. We climbed an easy mixed buttress off the glacier that ended in a gully below two easy ice steps. We thought is was L gully but now I'm not so sure. We climbed several short ice steps but mostly just perfect neve slopes to the summit ridge in two simul blocks. Above the cloud layer the wind was brutal. Summit was surprisingly calm. We down climbed the Cooper Spur in high winds with multiple dead ends and much GPS checking as the light faded. Once down on the lower spur it was easy going though still windy. It took us 16.5 hrs car-to-car. Gear Notes: We took the whole enchilada, but there is not much opportunity to place except occasional screws. Approach Notes: TJ sno-park normal approach to N side
  5. question Next Generation Hard Shells

    With some of the next generation hard shells (stretchy, breathable) coming out (NF Futurelight seems to be the most advertised) I'm curious if folks have tried them or seen good unbiased reviews/comparisons. I've typically worn softshells in true winter conditions as much as possible and pulled out the goretex for wet ice or technical climbing with spindrift/precip only when I really need to. Curious if this new new stuff lives up to the hype and could be a quiver-of-one outer layer...
  6. [TR] Glacier NP - multiple 11/22/2020

    @olyclimber and @JasonG thanks for the help! Pictures are now posted.
  7. [TR] Glacier NP - multiple 11/22/2020

    Views from up on Mt Brown... Views from Avalanche Lake basin... Sprague creek pillars... Lake Macdonald...
  8. dry tooling PNW Joins The 21st Century

    By PNW I think you mean the Seattle/WesternWA area... Various spots in Oregon and Eastern WA have had this going on for a while
  9. Funny thing I've noticed is that Shuksan's image gets (mis)used quite a lot. My mom visited Glacier NP a couple years a go and got me a tshirt at the gift store... it's definitely a picture of Shuksan on it and says "Glacier National Park" right above it.
  10. ROCKTOBER!

    Today (Sat 10/3) Smith was the busiest I've seen it since last fall. Seems like the park has thrown out all COVID precautions, even the grass overflow lot was open and mostly full. Still weirdly warm and smokey though.
  11. I recently bought this. It was on sale on Backcountry.com and I needed a new belay jacket. I had heard some good things about Norrona in general being a high quality brand from the Euros I climbed with in Canada last winter. It's one we don't see much of here so its kind of an unknown and I figured I'd give a run down as it is a very nice piece, well suited to Cascades winter climbing and a resonable price too. Pros: light weight, warm (relative to other 100g primaloft jackets I've tried this feels very warm), lower cost than some other high quality options like Patagonia or Arcteryx ($260), has several large pockets (2x chest outside of insulation, 2x hands inside insulation, 1x mesh inside jacket), double zipper, and MY FAVORITE... the hood is awesome (best single draw cinch i've seen, has a brim to shelter from spindrift, zips up to the nose, really seals in the warmth). Cons: I would prefer a second mesh pocket inside the jacket, the giant uninsulated chest pockets don't seem very useful to me at this point. Overall: I think this is a really well designed and quality belay parka.
  12. question Next Generation Hard Shells

    Bump... anybody got experience with newer extra-breathable/stretchy hard shells?
  13. DIY Altitude Training , does it work??

    If you read the Uphill Athlete literature they would advise you to save the money (and energy wasted sleeping like shit in your own bed) and just do way more easy aerobic volume. I find this helpful personally and have had a strong correlation between having lots of endurance and well rested/hydrated and doing great at altitude up to 14k'.
  14. Anyone Coached by Uphill Athlete or Other?

    If you're really looking for coaching and interested mostly in aerobic development I recommend Trails and Tarmac https://trailsandtarmac.com/coaching/ as an alternative that is a bit cheaper. They mostly train ultra runners but I have a couple mountain guide friends who have worked with them and seen significant results. One of their owners Ryan Ghelfi is a former mountain guide and still does a lot of skimo stuff.
  15. Anyone Coached by Uphill Athlete or Other?

    You could purchase an uphill athlete training plan. Paying a monthly fee is for people who really need hand holding... either because they aren't willing to put in the effort to read and learn themselves, they are lazy and rich, or they are really pushing their limits and need someone with lots of experience to hold them on that edge without going over. If you've read TFTNA and played around with training already you're most likely going to be able to coach yourself and see significant gains.
  16. Assuming it was from the plane that seems highly unlikely. Is it possible the chemicals in drugs could break down and yield a negative test after a winter and good portion of summer out there? Either that or it's a thinly veiled attempt to get those involved to incriminate themselves? What else could it be? Illegal shipment of cane sugar?
  17. idea Winter/Spring climbing glove discussion

    I have a lower quality Showa knock-off. They're durable but moisture builds up inside and kills the warmth too quickly for long days. I save them for wet leads. I've typically climbed alpine routes in the OR Arete which is good but less durable than I'd really like. I bought a variety of gloves off steepandcheap (you get what you pay for) the other year to try. Two were OR and they both wet out and then fail to dry... pretty terrible. One was BD, not super durable but stayed dry longer and dried out sooner. I would really like to support OR over BD but BD does seem to be doing a better job on the gloves right now. Cowolter I'll be trying those soloists and looking into the new Showas.
  18. I have two skimo harnesses I am getting rid of. Neither saw much use and are in good condition but both are older generation a few years old so assess and use at your own risk. I'm thinking $20 plus shipping unless you pickup (in Bend), but I'm open to offers. Edelrid Loopo Light BD Couloir
  19. Bozeman, MT or Victor/Driggs, ID

    If you're going to be mainly up in the summer I'd go with Driggs. If you want to mainly ice climb I'd go with Bozeman. There is going to be more of scene in Bozeman for sure with the bigger population and university. Driggs has a great community but it is small.
  20. Three Sisters Wilderness access

    Fire might have it closed? Call them up.
  21. Amazing effort; unfortunate ending. You'll be back soon for sure, just do the sh*t out of your PT.
  22. Since we're mostly stuck at home and lots of us have installed climbing walls or training apparatus of some sort I thought it would be fun to share what we have going on... maybe give each other some ideas for what we can do to stay fit during this time. Here's what I'm currently using: My wife and I got a squat rack a few years ago, which may not be reasonable purchase for some right now, but how we improvised to hang various rings and straps off it may be helpful. I also duct-taped some foam around the pull-up bar so I had a slide-able pad to hook ice tools on and there is a carabiner through the gymnast rings' webbing so you can clip the head of an ice tool to that for incline pull-ups and such. We use an old coffee table that is quite sturdy as a step-up box. Obviously the hangboard is key, with motivational picture cut out of old climbing rags and a hardware store screw-in hook in the top of the door frame to allow weight reduction on things like one arm hangs. Since my hangboard is very simple, but I also wanted to train pinches, I used some scrap wood and attached an old hook to it so I could add weight. Finally, I built a plice board ala Will Gadd https://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en_US/experience-story?cid=will-gadd-how-to-build-plice which also has wood slats that are smooth enough to crimp on without getting splinters and attached it to a (bigger and stronger than it looks) tree in the backyard with just a slight overhang. Cost about $75 for materials. Attachment to the tree is the crux, I went with 6" lag screws through pressure treated 2x6 and built off of that. Curious to see what others have done. Looking forward to getting more ideas!
  23. Nice! Glad you had fun. You'll have to return a little earlier in the summer for some good skiing.
  24. Trip: 3 Sisters Wilderness - 4 Sisters Traverse RT from Tumalo Falls w/ bike approach Trip Date: 06/26/2020 Trip Report: Normally I wouldn't bother to share a linkup like this, but I think this loop is very aesthetic (both in the areas you move through, and the logical line it draws on a map) and thought others out there might find use in the description... Ever since my first summer in Oregon when I went up several volcanoes I swore that I would never deal with the choss again unless it was coated in snow or ice (this trip fully confirmed that and now that I've done it I have no desire to repeat it, but some of you might be crazy/stupid enough to follow my footsteps). Because of this I had absolutely zero interest in the Sisters Traverse as a summer outing (skiing it in spring I was fine with and found enjoyable). Then, this past winter my friend Miles suggested I could do it as a human powered outing from my house in Bend. I believe he was envisioning something efficient like biking to Green Lakes or Pole Creek trailheads to shorten the distance on foot. However, I immediately thought of biking to Tumalo Falls and doing the traverse as a loop from there. This was for several reasons... 1. the road to Tumalo Falls draws a direct line toward the mountains from town (instead of going way out and around to other trailheads) 2. this road is less busy and more enjoyable to bike 3. the areas you would get to pass through on the approach/depproach are some of my favorite in the area (Farewell Bend trail, Tam Rim, Broken Top trail, Happy Valley and North Fork trail) which favorably skews the scenic hiking to scree slogging ratio 4. the bike and loop made for a logical line when drawn on a map and made it easy to do as a self-supported outing with no bike shuttling. While I thought it was a cool idea, I had other plans this summer. Unfortunately the solstice came and went without a favorable weather window in the less-chossy ranges that I prefer. So, with no other big objectives on the horizon and clear skies locally I ended a 3 day streak of sitting on the couch watching weather models and Netflix to take advantage of the long daylight hours. The nice thing about short trips from your home is the packing is minimal. I woke up, ate a big breakfast, packed and was out the door. Itinerary: bike to Tumalo Falls, hike Farewell Bend trail to FS road 370 N, W on Tam Rim Horse Trail to Tam Rim Trail and the far W end of Tam Rim, drop down cross-country and traverse high eventually picking up the Green Lakes Trail N, take a L on Camp Lake Trail and follow the climbers trail up to the Hayden Glacier and the saddle between North and Middle Sisters (I shiver bivied part way up the ridge above the saddle for a few hours), climb/descend North via the standard S Ridge to Bowling Alley, climb Middle via the N Ridge and descend the S Ridge to Chambers lakes, climb South via the NW Ridge (less steep than the N Ridge but lots of loose scree), and descend the standard climbers trail on the S side to just below the glacier, cut down to Green Lakes (careful not to get cliffed out here) and follow the trail around the S side of the main lake to the climbers trail for Broken Top, climb BT by the standard NW Ridge, scree ski down the W face and traverse L on flatter ground to pop over the SW ridge and connect to the Broken Top Trail, follow this E (lots of snow fields) over the ridge just S of Ball Butte (I cut cross country quite a bit here as everything was under snow), eventually connect with FS road 370 (S of where you had it the first time) headed N and then connect to the Metolius-Windigo Trail, this takes you to Happy Valley where it is only 4 miles of easy and slightly downhill trail to the bike at Tumalo Falls, from here I had a mere 14.5 mile net downhill ride back to my house, arriving home just before I needed to break out the headlamp. I could tell you all the little stories but they are a little hazy and seem rather irrelevant now. I'd love to see someone else do this loop fast. I bet there is someone out there who could destroy it, as supposed to be destroyed like I was. There is a fair amount of off-trail travel and the early summer timing after a wet spring meant there was still lots of snow and some fairly large river crossings, however I would rather have that than endless scree. Gear Notes: road bike, small pack, sun protection, blister kit, trail running shoes with gaiters, spare socks to switch out when your shoes get soaked, light pons/axe, emergency reflective bivy bag and micropuff for the shivering, lots of water to be found early season, GPS w/ topo map were helpful in optimizing the cross-country travel Approach Notes: ride yo bi-cycle!
  25. [TR] Mt Triumph - NE Ridge 07/17/2020

    What is the shortest rope you think you could rap with?
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