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prussik1

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About prussik1

  • Rank
    journeyman
  • Birthday 11/30/1999

Converted

  • Occupation
    skool teach
  • Location
    Portland, OR
  1. CLACKAMAS COUNTY SHERIFF OFFICE PLAN TO FORM CAPTIVE SAR UNIT AND STOP USING PMR For over 50 years, Clackamas County has called upon Portland Mountain Rescue (PMR) to perform the county’s most difficult, dangerous and most urgent search and rescue (SAR) missions, most notably on Mt. Hood. PMR has performed that service with distinction. Recently, Sheriff Craig Roberts announced that he is dismantling all current SAR teams with the intent to create a new Clackamas County Search and Rescue team within the sheriff’s office. He says he intends to stop calling on PMR for Mt. Hood rescues as soon as six months from now. The Sheriff has told us that PMR has served with distinction and has not done anything wrong to precipitate this change. PMR supports the Sheriff’s efforts to improve search and rescue in Clackamas County. We welcome many of the changes he wants to make. PMR has been cooperative and supports changes Sheriff Robert has already made. However, we believe public safety will be best protected by preserving PMR. Safely and effectively performing rescues in the extreme environment of Mt. Hood requires extensive training, mutual trust among rescuers and esprit de corps that has taken us decades to build. PMR believes the Sheriff’s objectives can be achieved while at the same time maintaining these critical attributes of PMR. • PMR is a fully self-funded team with no financial cost to the county or taxpayers. The Sheriff’s plan has no financial backing and will add burden to the county’s current financial deficit. We conservatively estimate that equipping and training a new mountain rescue unit would cost at least $500,000, even assuming all the work is done by volunteers. • PMR is accredited and peer reviewed by the Mountain Rescue Association (MRA) which ensures a high standard of proficiency. It would take many years for a new unit to attain this accreditation. • The current 1,200 years of accumulated PMR experience, in addition to the years devoted by previous members, has cultivated something extremely special and irreplaceable. Through decades of experience, PMR has developed a culture of trust and skill that cannot readily be transferred to a new team. • PMR’s volunteer rescuers are highly trained, very experienced, and disciplined experts in high angle and alpine rescues. The Sheriff’s plan leaves a deficiency in technical rescue resources and increases the county’s liability risk because they do not have the same experience in educating, developing standards for, or managing an alpine rescue team. • PMR is nationally recognized for this expertise, including developing state of the art rescue systems. PMR’s national reputation is an asset to the county that cannot be replaced. PMR • PMR’s reputation as an elite mountain rescue unit allows it to recruit outstanding individuals from the mountaineering community and it attracts funding from private donors. • Half of PMR’s Mission is public education to prevent potential rescues. Our reputation and credibility in the community facilitates the opportunities for public outreach. The Sherriff’s plan does not indicate any public education. We are asking the Sheriff to engage in a collaborate dialogue with us to identify his important objectives and to explore how those objectives can be met while preserving the critical attributes of PMR and avoiding a new financial burden for the county. We believe such a collaborative effort would produce a hybrid result that could be the model for excellence in mountain rescue. Notwithstanding the uncertainty with CCSO, be assured that PMR will continue to train, provide public education, and respond to all requests by the Sheriff to perform rescues. And we will do so at the highest level of service in mountain rescue. We highly value and appreciate your years of support of PMR, Chris Baker, President Portland Mountain Rescue email: President@pmru.org
  2. until
    Thursday March 5th @ Revolution Hall. Doors open 6pm, showing at 7pm. Facebook event URL: https://www.facebook.com/events/524615028267914/ Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mountainfilm-on-tour-tickets-84629468017?fbclid=IwAR3yUZhsXB69OAZn3Fu124GFkW36mQN23EYRhHzBStVZDl5reEc-E1vEBCk In advance $17, at the door: $22 All proceeds to benefit Portland Mountain Rescue
  3. Telluride Mtn. Film Fest: Portland Revolution Hall

    As of today, 98 tickets left!!
  4. On March 09 at the Revolution Hall, Portland Mountain Rescue will host the Telluride MountainFilm Festival which will screen leading independent documentary films from around the world focused on outdoor adventure. The films presented will be selected to be particularly interesting for a Portland audience including skiing, mountain biking, and surfing videos. Join us for a night of truly inspirational movies about the outdoors while supporting a great organization - Portland Mountain Rescue. The event will include a raffle of equipment for the outdoor enthusiasts. Sponsored locally by The Mountain Shop, all proceeds from the event benefit Portland Mountain Rescue. Tickets are $17 in advance and $22 at the door. Available at The Mountain Shop and online from the Revolution Hall.
  5. On March 10, at the Revolution Hall, Portland Mountain Rescue will host the Telluride Mountain Film Festival which will screen leading independent documentary films from around the world focused on outdoor adventure. The films presented will be selected to be particularly interesting for a Portland audience.Join us for a night of truly inspirational movies about the outdoors while supporting a great organization - Portland Mountain Rescue. The event will include a raffle of equipment for the outdoor enthusiasts. Sponsored locally by The Mountain Shop and North Drinkware, all proceeds from the event benefit Portland Mountain Rescue. Tickets are $17 in advance and $22 at the door. Available at The Mountain Shop and online from the Revolution Hall. Portland Mountain Rescue The Mountain Shop North Drinkware Revolution Hall
  6. On March 12 at the Aladdin Theater, Portland Mountain Rescue will host the Telluride Mountain Film Festival which will screen leading independent documentary films from around the world focused on outdoor adventure. The films presented will be selected to be particularly interesting for a Portland audience including bike packing and mountain biking videos.Join us for a night of truly inspirational movies about the outdoors while supporting a great organization - Portland Mountain Rescue. The event will include a raffle of equipment for the outdoor enthusiasts. Sponsored locally by The Mountain Shop, all proceeds from the event benefit Portland Mountain Rescue. Tickets are $17 in advance and $22 at the door. Available at The Mountain Shop and online from the Aladdin Theater. Doors open at 6 p.m., films begin at 7 p.m. See you there!
  7. Hood - Snow Conditions Report?

    So, right now (5/02)the conditions on the upper mountain, specifically on west crater face, is mostly hard ice. Strongly consider belaying your partner and protecting your route.
  8. May and June are the most popular months for climbing Mt. Hood. These also are some of the most dangerous months when calls to Portland Mountain Rescue (PMR) increase. Climbers can limit their risk of becoming the next PMR rescue mission by following simple safety tips: 1. Heed the weather. Foul weather is one of the most common factors in climbing incidents in the Cascades. Always check the forecast for the mountain, not for lowland areas. Weather can change rapidly in the mountains, and it often turns nasty on the upper mountain before harsh conditions hit tree line. If a storm cycle is predicted within 24 hours of your climb, consider a different outing. Be vigilant in observing the weather as you climb and head down at the first sign of an approaching storm. Climbers should also understand that avalanche risk persists into the Spring and Summer months. 2. Start early. Rock and ice fall are a common cause of Mt. Hood injuries. The upper crater can turn into a maelstrom of rocks and ice once the sun warms the high cliffs. Start your climb in the wee morning hours, called an “alpine start,” so you can summit and be out of the crater before the sun warms the crater walls. 3. Avoid high traffic. On a clear weekend day in May or June, hundreds of climbers share the narrow chutes that lead to the summit. Traffic jams result in climbers spending too long in the areas where rock and ice fall is the most dangerous. Even careful climbers cannot always avoid knocking loose ice or rock that fall like missiles on climbers below. Novice climbers amplify these risks because they tend to move slowly and are less adept at preventing rock and ice fall. PMR encourages novice groups to climb on weekdays when traffic is lower and conditions can be much safer. 4. Get training. Although folks have climbed Mt. Hood in tennis shoes in ideal conditions and more than one dog has made it to the summit, Mt. Hood is a serious and technical climb requiring solid mountaineering skills. Organizations such as the Mazamas offer robust training programs, and guide services provide enough basic training to climb Mt. Hood with the assistance of a guide. Although backpacking and hiking experience is helpful, it is no substitute for technical mountaineering skills. 5. Climb with companions. If something goes wrong, a lone climber is just that—alone. Teammates can provide emergency assistance, call for help, go for help, or evacuate an injured companion. 6. Carry the proper gear. The conditions on Mt. Hood require different gear than hiking in the Columbia Gorge. Appropriate clothing, ice axe, crampons and a helmet are just a few of the "must have" items. Visit pmru.org for a list of essential gear.. 7. Leave your itinerary with a trusted friend or family member. Although climbers are supposed to register at the Timberline Day Lodge and complete a form describing their route, schedule and equipment, these forms are no substitute for leaving this information with a friend. No one monitors these registration forms or checks to see if climbers have returned. We only review forms after a report is received that a climber is missing or in trouble. 8. Carry an emergency communication device. PMR recommends that climbers carry a personal locator beacon or a commercial device such as a SPOT unit, both of which can be purchased from outdoor stores. Mountain Locator Units or MLUs can be rented from REI or the Mountain Shop for use on Mt. Hood. Availability, however, is limited and you should always check in advance to ensure units are available. Cell phones can be a lifesaver, but they often do not work high on Mt. Hood, and there is no service for most of the mountain below tree line. 9. Know your route and how to navigate. Navigation above tree line can be easy on a sunny day, but a nightmare the moment snow or fog moves in. Backcountry travelers should carry a map and compass and know how to navigate with them. A GPS is a plus, but should not be the primary navigation tool. 10. Carry a blue bag. An alpine start, anxiety about the climb and changes in diet are a formula for emergency bathroom breaks on the climbing route. A busy climbing season can create serious sanitation problems. Blue bags are available at the climbers registry. Please bag your poop and carry it out for proper disposal.
  9. A Benefit for the Friends of the Northwest Avalanche Center Join us for an evening of good beer, good friends, gear raffle and live music. Where: Velo Cult Bike Shop 1969 NE 42nd Ave., Portland When: February 28, Doors at 7 p.m. Advance tickets $20 via www.snowbashpdx.brownpapertickets.com $25 at the door Must be 21 years or older to attend
  10. Portland Mountain Rescue Hosts the Telluride Mountain Film Festival on Tour Please join us! For one night only, on March 14 at the Bagdad Theatre, Portland Mountain Rescue will host the Telluride Mountain Film Festival which will screen leading independent documentary films from around the world focused on outdoor adventure. Join us for a night of truly inspirational movies about the outdoors while supporting a great organization - Portland Mountain Rescue. Sponsored locally by The Mountain Shop and Club Sport, all proceeds from the event benefit Portland Mountain Rescue. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at the door. Available at The Mountain Shop and online at cascadetickets.com. Visit www.pmru.org for more information. Hope to see you there!!
  11. The weather and snow conditions of any ski climb or backcountry adventure can change drastically in a matter of minutes. Presented by Portland Mountain Rescue (PMR), join us for this informative presentation to help you stay safe in winter conditions. PMR is a volunteer group dedicated to saving lives through rescue and mountain safety education. When: Tuesday, February 26, 6:30-8:00 p.m. Where: Hillsboro REI 2235 NW Allie Hillsboro, OR 97124 Cost: Free, but registration is required: http://www.rei.com/event/48656/session/65908
  12. The Summit: Ted Wheeler's Experience on Mt. Everest Sponsored by Columbia Sportswear Wednesday, May 16, 2012 5pm to 6:30pm McMenamin's Mission Theater (1624 NW Glisan St. in Portland) Suggested $25 contribution, benefiting Portland Mountain Rescue Ted Wheeler, former PMR member and current Oregon State Treasurer, is hosting a talk on May 16 to celebrate the 10th anniversary of his summit of Mt. Everest to benefit Portland Mountain Rescue! We would love to have a packed house for the event so please help us spread the word by inviting your friends. See you there!
  13. Visits to wild places are often deeply rewarding. These adventures also entail risks that can occasionally prove life threatening--even for the most experienced outdoors people. Join us for a safety talk focusing PLBs (Personal Locator Beacons), the MLU (Mt. Hood Mountain Locator Unit) and Avalanche Transceivers. March 14, Tualatin REI, 7-8 p.m., free. Register at http://www.rei.com/event/34866/session/43673
  14. Mt Hood

    Avalanche conditions are a real consideration anywhere on the mountain where the slope is above 20 degrees. West Crater rim avalanches ALL THE TIME, as does Wy'East and all other routes. I would recommend checking NWAC avalanche forecasts and weather forecasts from NOAA religiously before you climb, and then determining your acceptable level of risk. As it seems you have noticed, we have a one-day weather window before a fairly significant front will pass through. Good luck!
  15. Join us for a safety talk with Portland Mountain Rescue, focusing PLBs (Personal Locator Beacon), MLU (Mt. Hood Mountain Locator Unit) and Avalanche Transceivers. REI Hillsboro 2235 NW Allie Avenue, Hillsboro, OR 97124 Tuesday, February 28, 7 p.m., free.
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