Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Choada_Boy

Scarpa Freney XT??

Recommended Posts

Got some. My favorite boots, mainly because they fit my foot so well. Seem to be plenty warm, have fell in a creek wearing them ice climbing and they kept my feet dry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the Freney XT GTXs are about the best boots out there if you're looking for a lightweight, step-in crampon compatible, and fairly warm boot. It will fit a wider foot than the La Sportiva Nepal Extremes, and the price is about the same. Scarpa makes XTs and XT GTXs, make sure you get the latter with Gore-Tex linings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scarpa makes XTs and XT GTXs, make sure you get the latter with Gore-Tex linings.

 

I'd say just the opposite. GTX linings add suck, trench foot and price without significant performance improvements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wouldnt even think about buying a boot with that much stitching on it!!!! IT would last oh about 1-2 trips in the BC backcountry..

 

scarpa-freney-xt.jpg

 

I bought and wouldnt buy anything less than the all leather Nepal extremes..not the Evo's with their stupid gore lining

 

Nepal_Extreme.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question....the Nepal Extreme you mention now has the Gore/Duratherm liner as well. What's the point in having a full leather [assumed fully waterproof(able)] upper and a goretex liner?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't had any problem with the stitching in my Freneys, but the synthetic material has gotten all scraped up and appears to be deteriorating after a few light seasons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gore-Tex or not, another thing to consider is the Freneys are more than a pound lighter per pair than the Nepal Extremes.

 

Truth be told, I haven't noticed any ill effects from the GTX liners or the stitching. I also haven't been climbing in the BC backcountry lately, so you do the math :/ .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Freneys and the Nepals are different classes of boots. IMO the Freneys compare directly to the Trango Extremes in weight and construction. The Nepals are a bit heavier, but also "higher-topped", stiffer laterally and better built.

 

I really like the Trango Extremes for day routes in winter or summer trips where you wouldn't want a lighter boot. However, for super wet snow or multiday winter trips, I think that style of boot absorbs/leaks too much water.

 

In my experience, Goretex boot linings are just hype. Boots get wet, feet get wet. Maybe they keep the water back for a little while longer. However, it is worth noting that the Nepal Evo (GTX) is about a half pound lighter than the older Nepal Extreme.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good input. Thanks.

 

I've worn Scarpa boots for the last ten years or so (Assaults and Cerro Torres) and the quality and durability has been impeccable, so I would expect to find the same with the Freney's. The La Sportiva boots I've worn (Trangos), although functional, lack the thoughtfulness of design, attention to detail, and durability of the Scarpas. This matters a lot when you're shelling out $350 for a pair of boots, IMHO. La Sportiva boots are to a toyota, perhaps, as Scarps are to a Ferrari (patiently awaiting flamage over bad analogy)

 

I'd be wearing the Freneys for ice climbing and winter alpine climbs. Anyone climbing ice in the newer Freneys?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PM or email Ade... I believe he climbs in them.

 

DirtyHarry climbs more than most people on this site... I would talk to him more.

 

Also Elisif Harro wears them and she climbs a lot of ice/alpine.

 

And if you get a good fit out of Scarpa then Kayland will fit you also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John...what's the added benefit of a Goretex liner when you already have a waterproof(able) leather upper (i.e. Nepal EVO)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I haven't had any problem with the stitching in my Freneys, but the synthetic material has gotten all scraped up and appears to be deteriorating after a few light seasons.

 

Grab a tube of Seam Grip and those things will last a LOT longer. Good way to prevent having to spend a few hundred $$ more on new boots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
John...what's the added benefit of a Goretex liner when you already have a waterproof(able) leather upper (i.e. Nepal EVO)

 

FYI: the Nepal EVO does come with goretex assuming we are talking about the same boot...?

 

Goretex in a nutshell:

 

- Goretex is a membrane (piece of fabric) that has holes in it. The holes are smaller than water molecules but bigger than water vapor molecules. Basically water cant get in but water vapor can get out.

 

- Then why do my feet get clammy? Goretex much like a seattle freeway can and will clog up if you try and push too much volume. Goretex can only allow so many molecules to pass through the "holes" per hour. For goretex (not XCR) this is roughly 1 liter of water vapor per hour. What does than mean for you and I? Not too much... that is everyone perspires at a different rate. What you will find over time is you must remain vigilant and take layers on and off your torso before you feet get sweaty.

 

- Goretex as a material must be laminated (glued) to something to work. For boots this means either leather or some type of synthetic.

 

- Anything (not just boots) that has goretex isnt automatically waterproof. The fabric the goretex is laminated to must be periodically waterproofed.

 

- Are Goretex boots more waterproof than non Goretex boots? IMO it more depends on the manufacturer than whether or not it has goretex... I briefly submerged my non goretex boots in rivers/lakes before and my feet stayed dry as the boot was well made. I have had friends submerge their cheapo goretex boots and gotten soaked. Generally boots made in Italy tend to hold up longer than other countries... but that is based only on the few boots I have owned and/or climbing with a number of partners.

 

Bottom line: buy a boot first on fit. You will find some brands fit you better than others. Next buy off warmth... get a boot that will be warm enough for temps you plan on climbing in. Third: weight. The lighter the better.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

For goretex (not XCR) this is roughly 1 liter of water vapor per hour. What does than mean for you and I? Not too much...

 

 

1 liter per meter-squared of fabric? I'm curious on the area of gore-tex that this stat refers to.

 

Also, this figure probably assumes conditions where heat/water vapor (simulated sweat) is evenly dispersed on one side of the membrane to begin with, meaning not realistic to a human body. (think arm pit vs shoulder)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

P.S. If a boot does not have a Gore-Tex liner and you are worried about waterproofness... try this stuff.

OZ4.jpg

 

http://www.backcountry.com/store/MCN0020/c/s/McNett-ReviveX-Leather-Gel-Water-Repellent-and-Conditioner.html

 

Specifically designed to penetrate the material and be abrasion resistant, where NixWax and others just coat the surface and are quickly scraped off when kicking steps, hiking, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what's the added benefit of a Goretex liner when you already have a waterproof(able) leather upper

 

Trench foot..thats why gore in boots sucks ass

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a pair of Freney XT's when I was living in NH in 2004ish. The intention was to have a pair of boots that would climb ice well. These do. In NH they saw several winters where I climbed 75-90 days a year in them. They have held up very well for me. More than issues with external stitching (which has been minimal to none) the insulation has compressed over time making them less warm they they once were. These boots which once kept my feet warm in temps dipping to the negative single digits are now comfortable only in the teens.

Frankly in an ice boot, you don't need to worry about stitching blowing out because you aren't spending an inordinate amount of time "hiking" in them. Even waterproofness isn't a huge issue because the temps are usually low enough that there isn't alot of external melt trying to seep in. As well, if you are truly using them to climb ice in, you aren't even standing in snow most of the time.

These are ice boots not mountaineering boots.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hope I don't catch too much shit for digging this up...

I have a near new pair of Freney XT I am trying to make work on my foot

 

How do these boots compare, size wise (and where) compared to the Nepal EVO? I have the Nepal EVO as well, and it fits me well, but the scarpa I get heel lift, even with orthotics and using several overhand knots as I lace the boots.

 

Anyone remember these boots?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no statue of limitations on cc.com topics. The more obscure, the better.

 

:wave:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if this helps, Steve, but I've been a long time Scarpa boot wearer and just accepted heel blisters as the price to pay for the wider toe box. My understanding is the Sportiva lasts are typically a little narrower and certainly could have a better fit on your heel.

 

I picked up a pair of Salewa Rapace this summer and they seem to have a better heel hold, no blisters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×